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Survey Logo The Arkansas Archeological Survey's logo is taken from one of the oldest examples of graphic art in North America. Dating from the Poverty Point period (2,000 B.C.-500 B.C.), this soapstone bowl with maze-like design was discovered in Columbia County.

"Longnose"The icon for the "News and Current Research" section is taken from a pair of shell earrings found at the Spiro site just across the border in Oklahoma. The famous effigy pipe "Big Boy" sports earrings similar to these.

The icons used to represent the other sections are derived from rock art found in Arkansas:

AnthropomorphThis anthropomorphic figure was taken from a panel at the Narrows site northeast of Mountainburg. It was created by being pecked out and then painted with black and red pigment. Unlike other petroglyphs in the same panel, this one has four fingers represented on the right hand.

LoopThis distincitive spiral loop is just one of the many geometric designs found on Petit Jean Mountain, in the Indian Cave. It is approximately 27 cm and is easily located along the ceiling of the site.

Spiral The figure used in the Publications section was found in another site on Petit Jean Mountain. This pictograph showing two connected spirals was found on an overhang along with several other geometric figures and two paint handprints.

CrossResembling an outlined cross, this pictograph was found in southeastern Stone County. It was done in red ochre and may have some connection to sites found in the Petit Jean area.

SunburstThis sunburst figure was found on the ceiling near the front entrance of the Hardison Shelter on Petit Jean Mountain. This rock shelter is relatively small but does have a few well preserved pictographs like this one.

Rock Art Reference:

Fritz, Gayle J. and Robert H. Ray
  1982 Rock Art Sites in the Southern Arkansas Ozarks and Arkansas River Valley. In Arkansas Archeology in Review, edited by Neal L. Trubowitz and Marvin D. Jeter, pp. 240-276. Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series No. 15, Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Credits

This Web site is designed, developed and maintained by Deborah Weddle with contributions by various Survey staff members.

The Arkansas Archeological Society Web site is maintained by Glen Akridge.

The Rock Art in Arkansas Web site was designed and developed by John Samuelsen, Dr. George Sabo III, and Deborah Weddle.

The Archeological Parks Web site was developed by Mary Kwas (content) and Deborah Weddle (design and maintenance).

The First Encounters Web site was originally developed by Deborah Weddle in conjunction with Dr. George Sabo III.

The Indians of Arkansas website was developed by John Samuelsen in conjunction with Dr. George Sabo III.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have questions or comments about any of these pages.

 

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