Arkansas History: A Natural for the Classroom

Resource Guide

 

Preliminary Edition, June 1998


Compiled by:
Lea Flowers Baker
Leta Boswell
Mattie Collins
Greg Crawford
Tom Dillard
Debbie Greathouse
Susan Nannemann
Tim Nutt
Barbara Patty

Mike Polston

For the Deans Blue Ribbon Panel
Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences

University of Arkansas

 

 
This project was funded by grants from the Tyson Foundation, the Arkansas Community Foundation, the Bridge Fund, and the Arkansas Humanities Council, under the auspices of the Arkansas Historical Association and the Fulbright College of Arts & Sciences of the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.

Contents

I. Prehistory: The Land and Its People


II. Exploration & Colonization (1541-1818)


III. Territorial Arkansas (1819-1835)


IV. Statehood (1836-1860)


V. Civil War and Reconstruction (1861-1874)


VI. The New South (1874-1900)


VII. Progressive Era - World War I (1900-1918)


VIII. Roaring 20s - World War II (1918-1945)


IX. Era of Social Change (1945-1969)


X. Modern Arkansas (1970-Present)


XI. General Materials

 

I. Prehistory: The Land and Its People

Prehistory - Printed Materials

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Prehistoric and Historic Native American Indian Information Package. (Fayetteville: The Survey, nd.) Available from the Survey, P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, (501) 575-3556. M,S

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The History We Built. (Little Rock: AHPP, 1993.) Booklet features significant sites in Arkansas, including Toltec Mounds State Park. M,S

Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Lesson Plans (Watered-Down History; To Dam or Not To Dam; Riparian Retreat; Troubled Waters, Hold It; Oil Spill; Go With the Flow; Riverside Drive, and the Eco-Connection.) Contact the NHC at 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9159 for copies. M,S

Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Rivers and Reading. A booklist for young readers that will help them discover the beauty and wonder of streams (grades 5-12.) Contact the NHC at 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9159. P,M

Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, River Recreation Resources. For the outdoor recreation enthusiast, canoe safety information, maps highlighting popular float trips, and special mesh litter bags are all available for classes. Contact the NHC at 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9159. P,M,S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Arkansas Tech University, Museum of Prehistory and History. DiscoveryHandbook. (Russellville: Arkansas Tech University, 1994.) A 3-ring binder filled with numerous activities and lesson plans, including the books Crossroads of the Past and Paths of Our Children. Order from Arkansas Tech Museum. Ask for other materials. P,M,S

Bryan, Glenda. Teacher Education Packet: Archeology. (Jonesboro: Arkansas State University Museum, 1989.) This 92 page booklet provides lesson plans/activity sheets covering all periods of prehistoric Arkansas. Separate activities for primary, intermediate and secondary grade activities. Write Box 490, State University, AR 72467, (870) 972-2074. P,M,S

Delta Cultural Center. Floods, Mud, Trains, and Cotton, the Delta: Arkansas Land of Riches. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, nd.) A small booklet on the Deltas geography and its people and industry. P,M

Foti, Tom and Gerald Hanson. Arkansas and the Land and Its People. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1992.) Overview of Arkansas geography and the formation of the state. M,S

Guiccone, Margaret. Arkansas Through Time and Space.* (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993.) In-depth study of geological history of Arkansas. Workbook and companion videos can obtained at the Arkansas and Regional Studies Center. S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Hunter, Carl G. Trees, Shrubs, and Vines of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Ozark Society Foundation, 1989.) Identification of the large number of woody plant in Arkansas. P,M,S

_____. Autumn Leaves and Winter Berries in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Ozark Society Foundation, 1995.) P,M,S

_____. Wildflowers of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Ozark Society Foundation, 1984.) Comprehensive collection of photographs and general descriptions of Arkansas wildflowers. P,M,S

Jeter, Marvin D., editor. Edward Palmers Arkansaw Mounds. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1990.) Highly valuable book relative to Native American history, archeological studies, and nineteenth century Arkansas race relations. S

Lancaster, Bob. "In the Beginning." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Archeological sketch of early Native Arkansans. M,S

Old State House Museum. Arkansas Past and Present Activity Booklet. (Little Rock: Old State House Museum, 1994.) Workbook featuring activities related to the Native Americans. Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for complimentary copy. P,M

Schambach, Frank and Leslie Newell. Crossroads of the Past: 12,000 Years of Indian Life in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1990.) Students examine prehistoric Arkansas from the Ice Age to 1541, European settlement, and removal of tribes. Companion video available. P,M,S

Shepard, Bill, editor. Arkansas Natural Heritage. (Little Rock: August House, 1984.) Useful introduction to plants, animals and ecosystems of Arkansas. P,M,S

Stroud, Hubert and Gerald Hanson. Arkansas Geography: The Physical Landscape and the Historical-Cultural Setting. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1981.) Available through textbook depository. A good introduction to the natural divisions of Arkansas. M,S

Whayne, Jeannie, compiler. Cultural Encounters in the Early South: Indians and Europeans in Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1995.) A good overview of the colonial period. S

Prehistory - Media

Ancestral Beginnings. (Conway: Arkansas Educational Telecommunications Network, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. This video acquaints students with Arkansas earliest inhabitants and generates curiosity about the history of Arkansas.

Arkansas, Crossroads of the Past. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1988.) Exhibit. Students examine prehistoric Arkansas from the Ice Age to 1541, European settlement, and removal of tribes. P,M,S

Arkansas, Crossroads of the Past I. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1991-1992.) Slides. M,S

Arkansas, Crossroads of the Past II, III, IV. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1991-1992.) Slides. M,S

Arkansas Crossroads of the Past. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1996.) 38 minute video. Same as slideshow and exhibit. M,S

Arkansas Portraits: Images of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 30 minute video. Explores the visual arts of Arkansas from prehistoric to early statehood. M,S

Baker Prairie Slide Collection. (Little Rock: Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, 1995.) Slides. A collection of 38 paintings of wildflowers on Baker Prairie by internationally-recognized botanical artist Kate Nessler, has been photographed. Available for loan by calling (501) 324-9619. P,M,S

Black Swamp. (Conway: Arkansas Educational Television Network, 1995.) 60 minute video. Arkansas Educational Television Network documentary on the picturesque wetland along the Cache River in Eastern Arkansas features some of largest tracts of bottomland hardwood forest and information wetland ecosystems whose values we are only now beginning to comprehend. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

Early Caddoan Cultures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1982-1990) Slides. Covers the periods from A.D. 800 to 1200. Photographs include the ceramics and other traits of the culture. M,S

History and Prehistory in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1994.) Exhibit. Tabletop display with artifacts from Akansas five major periods of settlement. M,S

History Underground: Historical Archeology in Arkansas. (LR: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1996.) Slides. Examines the role of historic archeology in interpreting the recent past and how it differs from prehistoric archeology. M,S

Journey On the Arkansas. (Conway: Arkansas Educational Television Network, nd.) 15 minute video. This program explores the historical, economic, and scenic sides of the Arkansas River. M,S

Late Caddoan Cultures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1982-1990) Slides. Covers the period to A.D. 1200 to 1880. M,S

Mid America Science Museum. Web site. www.direclynx.net/~masm

Natural Elements of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, 1996.) No time indicated. Video. Views of Arkansas during the four seasons. Explanatory pamphlet included. P,M,S

Nature Conservancy. Web site. www.tnc.org

Prehistoric Mounds of the Ozarks. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, nd.) Exhibit. A photo exhibit illustrating the excavation of Prehistoric Indian sites near Huntsville, Madison County, Arkansas. M,S

Preserving the Past. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, nd.) Exhibit. A basic introduction to archeology in Arkansas. P,M,S

Southeastern Ceremonial Complex. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 198-1990.) Slides. Illustrates the ceremonial artifacts of this all but forgotten religion of the Mississippian people. M,S

Spiro Mounds. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1982-1990.) Slides, Describes the site and Mississippian art found at Spiro, Oklahoma in the Arkansas Valley near Fort Smith. M,S

Toltec Mounds and the Plum Bayou Culture. (Conway: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. This program features a visit to an archeology laboratory at Toltec Mounds State Park. Study guide available. M,S

Underground Arkansas. (Conway: Arkansas Educational Television Network, nd.) 27 minute video. Explores the breathtaking limestone caves and caverns located beneath the Arkansas Ozarks Mountains. M,S

United States Geological Survey. Web site. www.usgs.gov

Prehistory - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Archeological Survey, P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, or call (501) 575-3556 for the closest field office near you. There are full-time archeologists at nine research stations across the state. For publication lists, information, or inquiries about the program and volunteering, call the research station in Fayetteville.

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Arkansas Archeology: Guide to Sites, Parks and Museums. P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, (501) 575-3556. Use to locate archeological sites and resources around the state. P,M,S

Arkansas Forestry Commission. Educational materials and programs are available from 3821 West Roosevelt, Little Rock, AR 72204-6396 or call (501) 664-2531. Protects and develops forest resources for the state.

Arkansas Geographic Alliance. Limited resources and teacher training in the geography of Arkansas.

Arkansas Geographical Society, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, or call (501) 575-2000. Speakers; publishes Arkansas Journal of Geography.

Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Environmental Educational Partnership. Bear Hollow Natural Area is leased and managed by the Ozark Natural Science Center (ONSC), a residential facility that offers a variety of year-round programming opportunities in environmental education. The center contracts with fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade students. Facilities are also available for summer and weekend nature camps and for rental to organizations and groups. Contact the ONSC at Rt. 3, Box 184, Huntsville AR 72740, (501) 789-2754.

Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Technical Assistance. Indoor and outdoor activities that make use of the natural areas and data resources of this agency. Available are complimentary copies, information and a listing of natural areas, plant and animal species.

Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, River Otter Program (classroom speaker introduces students to the unique environment of a river by looking at one of its special inhabitants -- the river otter, 30 minutes, grades K-3); Model Watershed (portable, hands-on watershed demonstration model illustrates water pollution in a river or lake and surrounding lands. Students design and put in place certain "pollution solutions", one hour, grades 4-8); River Slide Show (explains importance of working to preserve Arkansas rivers as valuable natural resources, 20 minutes, grades 9-12); River Explorers Backpack (loan item packed with survival gear for river/ecology studies, including a variety of field guides, story books, video tapes with teachers guide, musical audio tape(with lyrics, pictures and posters, all grades.) Write the NHC at 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9159 for information on these programs.

Arkansas State University Museum, Box 490, State University, AR 72467, or call (870) 972-2074. Free. Museum features exhibits describing prehistoric life in northeast Arkansas.

Arkansas Tech University Museum of PreHistory and History, P.O. Box 8526,Tucker Hall, Suite 12, Russellville, AR 72801-8526, or call (501) 964-0826

Beaver Lake State Park, 20344 Hwy12 East, Rogers, AR 72756 or call (501) 789-2380. The Superintendent and/or volunteers can prepare programs focusing on the natural resources of Northwest Arkansas.

Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 67, Big Lake, AR 72442. Contact superintendent for details.

Buffalo National River, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1173, Harrison, AR 72602 or call (870) 741-5443. Park interpreters provide programs upon request during the school year and on a regular schedule during summer months on the natural and cultural history of the river.

Bull Shoals State Park, P.O. Box 205, Bull Shoals, AR 72619 or call (870) 431-5521. The Park Interpreter has, and can prepare, an array of demonstrations, presentations, trail walks, and water tours.

Cane Creek State Park, P.O. Box 96, Star City, AR 71667 or call (870) 628-4714. This park lies in two natural divisions. Programs and guided walks are available on those natural associations and the history of the park area.

Cossatot River State Park, Rt. 1, Box 170-A, Wickes, AR 71973 or call (870) 385-2201. The Park Superintendent can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks emphasizing the beautiful resources of the dramatic riverine environment.

Crater of Diamonds State Park, Rt. 1, Box 364, Murfreesboro, AR 71958 or call (870) 285-3113. Emphasis is on the geology and history of the diamond field. Groups can search for diamonds, the Visitor Center has exhibits, and Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Crowleys Ridge State Park, P.O. Box 97, Walcott, AR 72474-0097 or call (870) 573-6751. Emphasis is on the unique Crowleys Ridge and the CCC park construction. Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, trail walks, and CCC area tours.

Daisy State Park, HC-71, Box 66, Kirby, AR 71950 or call (870) 398-4487. Park Superintendent will present programs to school groups.

Degray State Park, Rt. 3, Box 490, Bismarck, AR 71929-8194 or call (870) 865-8194. Emphasis is on the Ouachita Mountain Natural Division, its plant and animal life, the history of the lake, and lumbering as demonstrated on the Saginaw Historic Trail. Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, trail walks, and water tours.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours upon request.

Devils Den State Park, 11333 W. Arkansas Hwy. 74, West Fork, AR 72774 or call (501) 761-3325. Emphasis is on the Ozark Mountain Natural Division featuring plants, animals, geology, endangered bats, and formation of the unique crevice area; also historic settlement and beautiful CCC work are interpreted. Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, trail walks, and historic tours. Exhibits and a classroom are available.

Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 1157, Crossett, AR 71635. Contact superintendent for details.

Hampson Museum State Park*, P.O. Box 156, Hampson, AR 72395-0156, or call (870) 655-8622. Admission charged. Small museum created to exhibit and interpret the large collection of artifacts from the Nodena site.

Henderson State University Mueum, HSU Box H-7841, Arkadelphia, AR 71999-0001, or call (870) 246-7311. Free admission. Prehistoric Caddo artifacts, natural history specimens featured in several exhibit rooms.

Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 1043, Russellville, AR 72801. Contact superintendent for details.

Hot Springs National Park, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs, AR 71902, or call (501) 624-3383. Exhibits and other materials on the history, prehistory and geology of the area, with emphasis on the use by prehistoric Indians of the hot springs and local stone called novaculite.

Lake Catherine State Park, 1200 Lake Catherine Park Road, Hot Springs, AR 71913-8605, (501) 844-4176. Emphasizes the Ouachita Mountain Natural Division, the building of Lake Catherine in the 1920s, and the CCC era. Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, trail walks, and water tours. A nature cabin interprets history and mans relationship to his environment.

Lake Charles State Park, HCR-67, Box 36, Powhatan, AR 72458 or call (870) 878-6595. Summer programs may include demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Lake Chicot State Park, Rt. 1, Box 1555, Lake Village, AR 71653, (870) 265-5480. On Arkansas largest natural lake, the park interprets life along the Mississippi, ox-bow lake formation, Lindberghs first night flight, the Civil War on the river, wetland values, and more. There is an attractive exhibit area and a classroom. Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, trail walks.

Lake Dardanelle State Park, Rt. 5, Box 358, Russellville, AR 72801 or call (501) 967-5516. Park staff can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Lake Fort Smith State Park, P.O. Box 4, Mountainburg, AR 72946 or call (501) 369-2469. In a valley surrounded by the Ozark Mountains, park staff can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Lake Ouachita State Park, HC-33, Box 1160, Mountain Pine, AR 71956 or call (501) 767-9366.

Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, trail walks, and water tours. Exhibits and a classroom are available.

Lake Poinsett State Park, Rt. 3, Box 317, Harrisburg, AR 72432 or call (870) 578-2064. Park staff can prepare demonstrations and presentations.

Logoly State Park, P.O. Box 245, McNeil, AR 71752 or call (870) 695-3561. An environmental education park, Logoly also interprets the history of the spa at famous Magnesia Springs. Park Interpreters ca prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks. Exhibits and a classroom are available.

Mammoth Spring State Park, P.O. Box 36, Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 or call (870) 625-7364. Arkansas largest spring, a dam, and a hydroelectric plant, an 1880s depot, and the Spring River are interpreted through demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Mid America Science Museum*, 500 Mid America Blvd, Hot Springs, AR 71913, or call (501) 767-3461 or 1-800-632-0583. Web Site: www.direclynx.net/~masm. Interactive exhibits demonstrating broad principles of energy, life, matter and perception. "Life" exhibits contain large freshwater aquarium featuring native Arkansas fish and exhibitions focusing on land formations, rivers, and weather of Arkansas. Nature trail highlights Arkansas flora and fauna.

Millwood State Park, Rt. 1, Box 37-AB, Ashdown, AR 71822, (870) 898-2900. Park staff can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks on the natural world in this rich South Arkansas habitat.

Moro Bay State Park, 6071 Hwy. 15 S, Jersey, AR 71651 or call (870) 463-8555. Located on the confluence of the Ouachita River and Moro Creek, this area is a rich riverine environment. Park staff can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Mount Nebo State Park, Rt. 3, Box 374, Dardanelle, AR 72834 or call (501) 229-3655. This history of Mt. Nebo includes the early 180s when it was called Mt. Magazine. Programs on early mountain life, operation as a huge resort, the only city in America with an all-woman board, the CCC era, and the park today. Geology, springs and wildlife are also interpreted. Park staff can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Museum of Prehistory and History, Arkansas Tech University, P.O. Box 8526, Russellville, AR 72801, or call (501) 964-0826. Focuses on prehistoric people of the Arkansas River Valley, the Ozarks and Ouachita Mountain. Free admission.

Museum of the Red River, 812 East Lincoln Road, Idabel, Oklahoma 74745, or call (580) 286-3616. Free admission. Exhibits feature prehistory and early history of the Caddo Indians of the Red River area in Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

Ouachita National Forest, P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs National Park, AR 71902. Contact superintendent for available materials.

Ozark National Forest, P.O. Box 1008, Russellville, AR 72801. Contact superintendent for available details.

Parkin Archeological State Park, P.O. Box 241, Parkin, AR 72373, or call (870) 755-2119. Seventeen-acre late Mississippi Period town with a large mound situated on the St. Francis River. Volunteer archeology opportunities during the summer!

Petit Jean State Park, Rt. 3, Box 340, Morrilton, AR 72110 or call (501) 727-5441. The scenery and history of the Petit Jean are outstanding. Programs include settlement, the striking work of the CCC and nature themes. Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

Pinnacle Mountain State Park, 11901 Pinnacle Valley Road, Roland, AR 72135 or call (501) 868-5806. An environmental state park, Pinnacle also interprets the history of the Pinnacle area. Park Interpreters can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks, and the park has an exhibit area and classroom.

Queen Wilhelmina State Park, HC-07, Box 53-A, Mena, AR 71953 or call (501) 394-2863. the nature of Arkansas second highest mountain as well as railroad and settler history are interpreted.

Saint Francis National Forest, P.O. Box 1008, Russellville, AR 72801. Contact superintendent for materials.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas beginning with the American Indian prehistory.

Spiro Mounds Archeological Park, Route Two, Box 339A, Spiro, OK 74959, or call (918) 962-2062. Free admission to the largest Mississippi Period ceremonial center. Features reconstructed Indian mounds, houses, and self-guided walking tour. The Visitors Center has interpretive exhibits with original and replicas of artifacts.

Texarkana Museums System*, 219 State Line Avenue, P.O. Box 2343, Texarkana, Texas 75504-2343, or call (903) 793-4831. Admission charged. Exhibits on history and prehistory, with focus on Caddo culture and the Red River valley in southwest Arkansas.

Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park*, 490 Toltec Mounds Road, Scott, AR 72142, or call (501) 961-9442. Admission charged. Center of Plum Bayou culture from AD 640 to 1050. Five mounds visible on self-guided walking tours. Visitors center has exhibits on the use and layout of the site.

Turner Neal Museum of Natural History, University of Arkansas at Monticello, P.O. Box 3480, Monticello, AR 71656, or call (870) 460-1016. Free admission. Museum features a few exhibits describing the prehistory of southeast Arkansas.

University of Arkansas Museum, University of Arkansas, Fayettevlle, AR 72701, or call (501) 575-3466. Free admission. Features historic, natural history, and geological exhibits. Best known for their prehistoric artifacts from Arkansas.

Universal Geographic.* Request information on laminated desk maps and teachers guide for Arkansas. P.O. Box 14092, Baton Rouge, LA 70898.

Village Creek State Park, 201 CR 754, Wynne, AR 72396 or call (870) 238-9406. Park Interpreters use demonstrations, presentations, activities, exhibits, and trail walks to interpret the plants, animals, and the formation of the unique Crowleys Ridge. Two classrooms and a "Discovery Center" exhibit area are available.

Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 279, Turrell, AR 72384, (870) 343-2595. Contact superintendent for details.

White Oak Lake State Park, Rt. 2, Box 28, Bluff City, AR 71722 or call (870) 685-2748. This state park has designed a series of grade/subject programs available for schools. Programs, demonstrations, and trail walks are also available.

Wooly Hollow State Park, 82 Wooly Hollow Road, Greenbrier, AR 72058 or call (501) 679-2098. Programs may emphasize edible and medicinal plants, the CCC dam construction, the one-room log cabin of the Wooly family or the parks natural resources. Park staff can prepare demonstrations, presentations, activities, and trail walks.

 

II. Exploration & Colonization (1541-1818)

Exploration & Colonization - Printed Materials

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Prehistoric and Historic Native American Indian Information Package. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas.) Write P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, or call (501) 575-3556. M,S

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The History We Built. (Little Rock: AHPP, 1993.) Booklet features significant sites in Arkansas, including Arkansas Post. M,S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Arkansas Territorial Restoration. Colonial Arkansia. Brief reference and map on colonial Arkansas. Write 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150 for a complimentary copy; e-mail info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Arnold, Morris. Colonial Arkansas, 1686-1804. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1991.) Description of settlement of Arkansas by the French and Spanish. S

Arnold, Morris. Unequal Laws Unto a Savage Race: European Legal Traditions in Arkansas, 1686-1836. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1985.) Though technical, this is a good reference source. S

Baird, W. David. The Osage. (Phoenix: Indian Tribal Series, 1972.) An elementary level textbook history of the tribe. P,M

Baird, W. David. The Quapaw. (Phoenix: Indian Tribal Series, 1972.) An elementary level textbook history of the tribe. P,M

Baird, W. David. The Quapaw Indians: A History of the Downstream People. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1980.) An adult-level history of the tribe. S

Bolton, S. Charles, Carl Moneyhon, C Fred Williams, LeRoy Williams. A Documentary History of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1984.) Story of birth and development of Arkansas through primary documents. M,S

Clayton, Lawrence A., Vernon J. Knight, Jr. and Edward C. Moore, editors. The DeSoto Chronicles: The Expedition of Hernando DeSoto to North America in 1539 to 1543. (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1993.) Reprint of surviving DeSoto chronicles. S

Coleman, Roger. The Arkansas Post Story: Arkansas Post National Memorial. (Santa Fe, NM: Southwest Cultural Resources Center, 1987.) A history of Arkansas Post. Contact the Arkansas Post National Memorial for purchase information. S

Davis, Hester. Arkansas Before the Americans. (Fayetteville: Arkansas Archeological Survey, 1991.) Look at Arkansas before the Louisiana Purchase. M, S

Delta Cultural Center. Floods, Mud, Trains, and Cotton, the Delta: Arkansas Land of Riches. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, nd.) A small booklet on the Deltas geography and its people and industry. P,M

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanities Council.

Dickinson, Samuel D. "Don Juan Filhiol at Ecore a Fabri." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLVI (Summer 1987), 133-155. Sent to Arkansas in 1783, he tried to bring law and order to the Ouachita Valley region. M,S

_____. "Where the Buffalo Roamed." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Information on early French hunters in Arkansas. S

Din, Gilbert C. "Arkansas Post in the American Revolution." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XL (Spring 1981), 3-30. A useful summary of the English attack on Arkansas Post and the role the Post played in the war. M,S

Fountain, Sarah M, editor. Authentic Voices: Arkansas Culture, 1541-1860. (Conway: University of Central Arkansas Press, 1986.) Primary source material. Available through the state book depository. P,M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Lancaster, Bob. "Into the Wilderness." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Story of Hernando de Sotos entrada.S

_____. "The Most Interesting Water." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Story of the Red River Expedition commissioned by President Jefferson. S

Lancaster, Bob. "Native Arkansans." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) The story of the Quapaws. M,S

_____. "Paddling the Big River of a New World." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) The story of Robert Cavalier de la Salle and his explorations into Arkansas. S

McGimsey, Charles. Indians of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: Arkansas Archeological Survey, 1969.) Concise history of the Native American presence in the state. P,M

Old State House Museum. Arkansas Past and Present Activity Book. (Little Rock: Old State House Museum, 1994.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a complimentary copy. P,M

Old State House Museum. Old State House News. (Back issues include, Nineteenth Century Arkansas, Spring 1984; People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We lived, Spring 1995; and Arkansans Mae Music, Fall 1995.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a copy. P,M,S

Sabo, George III. Paths of Our Children: Historic Indians of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: Arkansas Archeological Survey, 1992.) An excellent analysis of the various tribes after the arrival of the Europeans, including the usually neglected Tunicas and Koroas. P,M,S

Whayne, Jeannie, editor. Cultural Encounters in the Early South. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1995.) The story of Indian relations with the Europeans. S

Woodward, Grace Steele. The Cherokees. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1963.) A general history of the tribe. S

Young, Gloria A. And Michael P. Hoffman, editors. The Expedition of Hernando DeSoto West of the Mississippi, 1541-1543: Proceedings of the DeSoto Symposium, 1988 and 1990. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993.) The definitive word on De Sotos route. S

Exploration & Colonization - Media

Arkansas, Crossroads of the Past. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1988.) Exhibit. Students examine prehistoric Arkansas from the Ice Age to 1541, European settlement, and removal of tribes. P,M,S

Arkansas, Crossroads of the Past I. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1991-1992.) Slides. M,S

Arkansas, Crossroads of the Past II, III, IV. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1991-1992.) Slides. M,S

Arkansas Crossroads of the Past. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1996.) 38 minute video. Same as slideshow and exhibit. M,S

Arkansas Historical Dance. (Conway: Ozark Heritage Institute, ca1995.) 57 minute video. Program explores dance traditions brought to Arkansas by its earliest settlers. A teachers guide is available. P,M,S

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage: 1800-1861. (Conway: AETN, 1981-1984.) 45 minute video or filmstrip. The viewer is taken on a tour of significant architectural sites around the state. M,S

Arkansas Portraits: Images of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 30 minute video. Explores the visual arts of Arkansas from prehistoric to early statehood. M,S

Arkansas Post: A Townsite Tour. (Conway: AETN, 1997.) No time indicated. The colonial town of Arkansas Post is visually reconstructed. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

First Encounter. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Students learn about the first European expedition in our area, and about the explorers dealings with the Indians. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

The Keetowahs Come Home. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1995.) 30 minute video. The story of the group of Indians, forced to leave their home in 1828 and their "return" to Arkansas in 1994. Teacher packet available. M,S

Relief Map of Arkansas. (Ft. Collins, CO: American Educational Products, nd.) Contact the company at P.O. Box 2121, Ft. Collins CO 80522, or call 1-800-446-8767. The area representative is Gene Sweptson, P.O. Box 7376, Little Rock, AR 72217; (501) 374-6024.

Under European Flag. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Program traces the development of Arkansas area from the time of French occupation to its status following the Louisiana Purchase. M,S

Exploration & Colonization - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Archeological Survey, P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, or call (501) 575-3556 for the closest field office near you. There are full-time archeologists at nine research stations across the state. For publication lists, information, or inquiries about the program and volunteering, call the research station in Fayetteville.

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Arkansas Archeology: Guide to Sites, Parks and Museums. P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, (501) 575-3556. Use to locate archeological sites and resources around the state. P,M,S

Arkansas Post Museum*, 5530 Hwy 165 South, Gillett, AR 72055, or call (870) 548-2634. Five exhibit buildings depicting Arkansas history from colonial days to modern era.

Arkansas Post National Memorial, National Park Service, 1741 Old Post Road, Gillett, AR 72055, or call. (870) 548-2207. Free admission. In the 18th and 19th century, Arkansas post was the major stopping place between St. Louis and New Orleans. It was a bustling river port city when it was bombarded by the Civil War; by the beginning of the 20th century, it was abandoned. The Visitor Center features exhibits and audiovisual programs about French, Spanish and Colonial life. Tours upon request. Will send speakers to schools.

Arkansas State University Museum, Box 490, State University, AR 72467, or call (870) 972-2074. Free admission. Museum features exhibits describing life in northeast Arkansas.

Caddo Indian Tribe, P.O. Box 487, Binger, OK 73009, or call (405) 656-2344. The Tribe has information on history and culture.

Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Post Office 948, Tahlequah, OK 74465, or call (918) 456-0671. Has information on history and culture of the tribe.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350 Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Hot Springs National Park, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs, AR 71902, or call (501) 624-3383. Contact the park for materials on the exploration of the hot springs and De Sotos trek into Arkansas.

Louisiana Purchase State Park. Call (870) 682-2187. This is an unmanned park, but there is a boardwalk with wayside exhibits detailing the first survey of the Louisiana Purchase.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old Davidsonville State Park, 7953 Highway 166 South, Pocahontas, AR 72455, or call (870) 892-4708. Usage fees charged. Established in 1815 on the Southwest Trail from St. Loui to Texas, this settlement boasted the first post office, courthouse, and land office in Arkansas Territory.

Osage Tribe of Oklahoma, 627 Grandview, Tribal Administration Building, Pawhuska, OK 74056, or call (918) 287-2495. Information on the history and culture of the tribe.

Powhatan Courthouse State Park, P.O. Box 93, Powhatan, AR 72458 or call (870) 878-6794. The museum emphasizes the history of Lawrence County from its establishment with the first Arkansas Post Office at Davidsonville in 1818. Exhibits, tours, and the restored jail can be enjoyed.

Quapaw Nation of Oklahoma, P.O. Box 765, Quapaw, OK 74363-0769, or call (918) 542-1853. Request information on history and culture of the tribe.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas.

Texarkana Museums System*, 219 State Line Avenue, P.O. Box 2343, Texarkana, TX 75504-2343, or call (903) 793-4831. Exhibits on history and prehistory, with focus on Caddo culture and the Red River valley in southwest Arkansas.

 

III. Territorial Arkansas (1819-1835)

Territorial Arkansas - Printed Materials

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Prehistoric and Historic Native American Indian Information Package. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas, nd.) Various activities are included such as word searches and crossword puzzles.

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Bearss, Edwin. Fort Smith: Little Gibraltar on the Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979.) Good information on the Indian and military relationships. M,S

_____. "In Quest of Peace and the Indian Border: The Establishment of Fort Smith." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXIII (Summer 1964), 123-153. The factors that led to the creation of Fort Smith are discussed. M,S

Bennett, Swannee and William B. Worthen. Arkansas Made I and II. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1990 and 1991.) Decorative arts in Arkansas from 1819-1880. S

Bolton, S. Charles, Cal Ledbetter, Jr. and Gerald Hanson. Arkansas Becomes a State. (Little Rock: UALR Center for Arkansas Studies, 1985.) A good introduction to the territorial period. S

Bolton, S. Charles. Territorial Ambition: Land and Society in Arkansas, 1800-1840. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993.) A statistical study of territorial Arkansas. S

Carter, Clarence E., editor. Territorial Papers of the United States: The Territory of Louisian-Missouri, 1815-1821. (Washington: Government Printing Office, XV, 1951); The Territory of Arkansas, 1819-1825, XIX (1953); The Territory of Arkansas, 1825-1829, XX (1954); The Territory of Arkansas, 1829-1836, XXI (1954). Government correspondence from the territorial period. Good primary source materials. S

Dale, Gary R. Adventures in Arkansas History: Life on the Farm. (Little Rock: Arkansas Farm Bureau Federation, 1995.) The series offers activities for all grade levels. Contact county Farm Bureau agent for information. P,M,S

Delta Cultural Center. Floods, Mud, Trains, and Cotton, the Delta: Arkansas Land of Riches. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, nd.) A small booklet on the Deltas geography and its people and industry. P,M

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanities Council.

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Our Feet Are Turned Towards the West: American Indian Removal in Arkansas, 1820-1840. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Synopsis of removal of the five civilized tribes with emphasis on their experiences/travels in Arkansas. Maps included. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

_____. Regnat Populus: The 19th Century Governors of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Brief biographies of governors of the state during the 1800s. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

Dickinson, Sam. "A Gang Calls Arkansas Home." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) The story of John Murrell and his gang in the 1830s. M,S

Fountain, Sarah M. Authentic Voices: Arkansas Culture, 1541-1860. (Conway: University of Central Arkansas, 1986.) Arkansas literature. M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Keefe, James F. And Lynn Morrow, editors. The White River Chronicles of S. C. Turnbo. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) Folktales and tall tales of territorial Arkansas. M,S

Lack, Paul D. "An Urban Slave Community: Little Rock, 1831-1862." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLI (Autumn 1982), 258-287. A useful survey of Little Rocks slave life. M,S

Lancaster, Bob. "Native Arkansans." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Story of the Quapaws, 1600-1834. S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Medearis, Mary. Washington, Arkansas: History on the Southwest Trail. (Hope: Etter Printing Company, 1976.) Engagingly written brief piece on a early Southwest Arkansas town. P,M,S

Mitchell, Starr, editor. Printer to the Territory. (Little Rock: Arkansas Territorial Restoration, 1997.) An 8-page booklet on William E. Woodrff. Includes some classroom activities. P,M

Neal, Joseph. "The Naturalist Travels the Territory." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Article about John James Audubon in Arkansas. M,S

Nuttall, Thomas. Journal of Travels into the Arkansas Territory During the Year of 1819. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1980.) Data on the flora and fauna of the territory. M,S

Old State House Museum. Arkansas Past and Present Activity Book. (Little Rock: Old State House Museum, 1994.) A book of information and activities on various time periods of Arkansas history. P,M

Old State House Museum. Old State House News. (Back issues include, Nineteenth Century Arkansas, Spring 1984; Territorial Period, 1819-1836, Fall 1985; People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a complimentary copy. P,M

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. 175 Years of Arkansas Newspaper History. (Little Rock: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, 1996.) An 8-page overview of the newspapers history. M,S

Penick, James. The New Madrid Earthquake of 1811-1812. (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1976.) Highly regarded historical account. S

Pope, William F. Early Days in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Allsopp, 1895.) Perhaps more colorful than reliable, but still and important primary source. M,S

Ross, Margaret. Arkansas Gazette: the Early Years, 1819-1866. (Little Rock: Arkansas Gazette Foundation, 1969.) History of the territory and state, as well as the paper. M,S

Ross, Margaret, editor. The Letters of Hiram Whittington. (Little Rock: Pulaski County Historical Quarterly, Bulletin #3, 1956.) Early settler of Garland County and an intern of Judge William Pope. M,S

Schoolcraft, Henry. Rude Pursuits and Rugged Peaks: Schoolcrafts Ozark Journal, 1818-1819. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) Diary of his exploration, focusing on flora and fauna. M,S

White, Lonnie. Politics on the Southwestern Frontier: Arkansas Territory, 1819-1836. (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 1964.) Territorial politics reviewed. S

Williams, W.D. "Louis Bringier and His Description of Arkansas in 1812." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLVIII (Summer 1989), 108-136. Brief buy useful early descriptions. M,S

Territorial Arkansas - Media

Archeology: The Chester Ashley and Brownlee-Nowland Houses. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. This program features two archeological excavations in Little Rock. M,S

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage: 1800-1861. (Conway: AETN, 1981-1984.) 45 minute video or filmstrip. The viewer is taken on a tour of significant architectural sites around the state. M,S

Arkansas Music. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Experience the wide scope of Arkansas music from folk to Negro spirituals to jazz. M,S

Arkansas Portraits: Images of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 30 minute video. Explores the visual arts of Arkansas from prehistoric to early statehood. M,S

Birth of Politics. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Program focuses on political issues and figures of the territorial period and shows the emergence of two parties. M,S

The Character of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Pioneer life recreated with short biographies of pioneer Arkansans. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

Five Tribes. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Program creates an awareness of individual characteristics of each of the five Indian tribes that inhabited Arkansas. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

Isaac the Bartender. (Little Rock: ATR, 1994.) 10 minute video. Society happenings are noted while working in the Hinderliter Saloon at the Arkansas Territorial Restoration. M,S

Isabel Brownlee. (Little Rock: ATR, 1994.) 10 minute video. Re-enactment at the Arkansas Territorial Restoration. While trying to sell the house, Isabel discusses the features and furnishings of a house built in the 1800s. M,S

Jacksonport and the Steamboat Era. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Students will discover Jacksonport, the historic river port town, learn about steamboats and view early photographs of Jacksonport. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

Printer to the Territory. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council and Arkansas Territorial Restoration, 1978.) 60 minutes video. Drama/documentary recalls the political events surrounding William Woodruff and his newspaper, The Arkansas Gazette. M,S

The Southwest Trail: Legends and Lore. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Students are introduced to the American folk heros: Black, Bowie, Houston, and Crockett, Old Washington State Park and Stagecoach House. S

Territorial Arkansas. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Program outlines procedures Arkansas followed in acquiring territorial status and describes daily life in the Arkansas Territory. M,S

United States Geological Society. Earthquake Videos: New Madrid. (Menlo Park, California: U.S. Geological Survey, 1994.)

Territorial Arkansas - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Archeological Survey, P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, or call (501) 575-3556 for the closest field office near you. There are full-time archeologists at nine research stations across the state. For publication lists, information, or inquiries about the program and volunteering, call the research station in Fayetteville.

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Arkansas Archeology: Guide to Sites, Parks and Museums. P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, (501) 575-3556. Use to locate archeological sites and resources around the state. P,M,S

Arkansas Post National Memorial, National Park Service, 1741 Old Post Road, Gillett, AR 72055, or call (870) 548-2207. Free admission. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Arkansas Post was the major stopping place between St. Louis and New Orleans. It was a bustling river port city when it was bombarded by the Civil War; by the beginning of the 20th century, it was abandoned. The Visitor Center features exhibits and audiovisual programs about French, Spanish and Colonial life. Tours upon request. Speakers available for school visits.

Arkansas State University Museum, Box 490, State University, AR 72467, or call (870) 972-2074. Free admission. Museum features exhibits describing life in northeast Arkansas.

Arkansas Territorial Restoration*, 200 East Third Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9351. Visit some of the earliest homes in Arkansas, visitors center, and changing exhibits pertaining to life in Arkansas from 1819 to the early 1860s. Living history characters and craft demonstrations offered regularly. Guided tours available.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350 Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours upon request.

Fort Smith National Historic Site*, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1406, Fort Smith, AR 72902, or call (501) 783-3961. Admission charged. Visit the military post established in 1817 to keep peace between Cherokee and Osage Indians, reconstructed courtroom, jail and other exhibits.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old Davidsonville State Park, 7953 Highway 166 South, Pocahontas, AR 72455, or call (870) 892-4708. Usage fees charged. Established in 1815 on the Southwest Trail from St. Louis to Texas, this settlement boasted the first post office, courthouse, and land office in Arkansas Territory.

Old Fort Museum, 320 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith, AR 72901, (501) 783-7841. Includes exhibits and artifacts on Fort Smith and Western Arkansas and Indian Territory from territorial times to the present. Includes working 1930s soda fountain. Various programs available upon request. Free admission to school groups.

Old State House Museum, 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685. Arkansass state capitol building from 1836 to 1911 and the oldest surviving Greek Revival state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Exhibits on Arkansas history. Free admission, tours available.

Old Washington Historic State Park, P.O. Box 98, Washington, AR 71862, or call (870) 983-2684. Thriving antebellum frontier town on the Southwest Trail. Many historic buildings are open for tour.

Prairie County Museum*, Rt. 2, Box 154, Des Arc, AR 72040, or call (870) 256-3711. Exhibits on the history of Arkansas navigable rivers from 1831-1931. Focuses on rivers as western migration and transportation routes.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas.

Texarkana Museums System*, 219 State Line Avenue, P.O. Box 2343, Texarkana, TX 75504-2343, (903) 793-4831. Contact museum for appropriate programs.

 

IV. Statehood (1836-1860)

Statehood - Printed Materials

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The History We Built. (Little Rock: AHPP, 1993.) Booklet features significant sites in Arkansas, the Old State House. M,S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Barjenburch, Judith. "The Greenback Political Movement: An Arkansas View." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXVI (Summer 1977), 107-122. A short sketch of a party with a short history in Arkansas. M,S

Bolsterli, Margaret Jones, editor. Harriet Bailey Bullock Daniels Memories of a Frontier Plantation in Arkansas, 1849-1872. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993.) S

Boyette, Gene. The Whigs of Arkansas, 1836-1856. (Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, 1972.) Scant information is available on this political party in the state. S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Brown, Walter Lee. A Life of Albert Pike. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) The definitive biography of Pike. S

Delta Cultural Center. A Land Promised: Immigrants in the Arkansas Delta. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Beginning in the 1840s and continuing to the early twentieth century, different ethnic groups immigrated to the Arkansas Delta. M,S

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanities Council. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Our Feet Are Turned Towards the West: American Indian Removal in Arkansas, 1820-1840. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Synopsis of removal of the five civilized tribes with emphasis on their experiences/travels in Arkansas. Maps included. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

_____. Regnat Populus: The 19th Century Governors of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Brief biographies of governors of the state during the 1800s. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

_____. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 374-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Fountain, Sarah M. Authentic Voices: Arkansas Culture, 1541-1860. (Conway: University of Central Arkansas Press, 1986.) Arkansas literature. M,S

Davis, Granville D. "The Granger Movement in Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, IV (Winter 1945), 340-352. A history of the first farm movement in Arkansas, active in the 1870s. M,S

Elkins, F. Clark. "Agricultural Wheel: County Politics and Consolidation, 1884-1885." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXIX (Summer 1970), 52-175. The populist farmers group organized in Arkansas almost changed the face of state politics during its brief existence. M,S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas: Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) Biographies of the states governors. M,S

Gerstacker, Frederick. Wild Sports in the Far West. (Many editions. Reprinted Durham: Duke University Press, 1969.) Tall tales of territorial and statehood. M,S

Gerstacker, Frederick. In the Arkansas Backwoods. (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1991.) Collection of short stories originally published in Germany. Contains excellent introduction and bibliography. M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Lack, Paul D. "An Urban Slave Community: Little Rock, 1831-1862." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLI (Autumn 1982), 258-287. A useful survey of Little Rocks slave life. M,S

Lancaster, Bob. " Memories of a Horror Story." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Arkansas slave narratives from 1930s WPA interviews. M,S

_____. "Mormons Wage a Holy War." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Story of the 1857 Mountain Meadows Massacre. M,S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Medearis, Mary. Washington, Arkansas: History on the Southwest Trail. (Hope: Etter Printing Company, 1976.)

Old State House Museum. Arkansas Past and Present Activity Book. (Little Rock: Old State Hsouse Museum, 1994.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a complimentary copy.

_____. Old State House News. (Back issues include, Nineteenth Century Arkansas, Spring 1984; Early Statehood, 1836-1860; People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a complimentary copy.

Patterson, Ruth Polk. The Seed of Sally Goodn: A Black Family of Arkansas, 1833-1953. (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1985.) An account of a black family in the Muddy Fork community north of Nashville, Arkansas. S

Ragsdale, William Oates. They Sought a Land: A Settlement in the Arkansas River Valley, 1840-1870. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) S

Ross, Margaret. Arkansas Gazette: the Early Years, 1819-1866. (Little Rock: Arkansas Gazette Foundation, 1969.) S

_____. "Nathan Warren: A Free Negro of the Old South." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XV (Spring 1956), 53-61. One of the few free blacks on whom enough is known to warrant a biography. M,S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to present. M,S

Smith, Harold T. "The Know-Nothings in Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXIV (Winter 1975), 291-303. A short survey of a short-lived party. M,S

Taylor, Orville. Negro Slavery in Arkansas. (Durham: Duke University Press, 1958.) Old, but some useful information. S

Trimble, Mike. "Swimming a Tortured Existence." Arkansas Times: AHistory of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) A brief biography of Albert Pike. M,S

Walz, Robert. Migration into Arkansas, 1834-1880. (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1958.) A 2-volume dissertation with lots of statistics. S

Williams, Leonard, editor. Cavorting on the Devils Fork: The Pete Whetstone Letters, C.F.M. Noland. Memphis: Memphis University Press, 1979.) Complete collection of Whetstone material. S

Woods, James. Rebellion and Realignment: Arkansas Road to Secession. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1985.) A history of Arkansas secession movement. S

Worley, Ted R. "An Early Arkansas Sportsman: C.F.M Noland." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XI (Spring 1952), 25-40. A useful introduction to the author of the "Pete Whetstone" letters. M,S

Zorn, Roman J. "Arkansas Fugitive Slave Incident and Its International Repercussions." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XVI (Summer 1957), 139-144. Fayetteville slave Nelson Hackett, who escaped to Canada on a stolen horse, was surrendered to Arkansas officials on a felony warrant. The incident threatened to make Canada useless for runaway slaves in the years 1842-1844. S

Statehood - Media

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage: 1800-1861. (Conway: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984.) 45 minute video or filmstrip. The viewer is taken on a tour of significant architectural sites around the state. M,S

Arkansas Portraits: Images of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 30 minute video. Explores the visual arts of Arkansas from prehistoric to early statehood. M,S

The Arsenal and Mount Holly Cemetery. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Tour of Mount Holly Cemetery and the Little Rock Arsenal. M,S

The Character of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Pioneer life recreated with short biographies of pioneer Arkansans. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

Early Statehood. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Shows gradual progress in Arkansas since territorial days and recounts the administrations of our first five governors. M,S

The Gathering. (Little Rock, ATR, 1995.) 30 minute video. A recreation of a slave gathering by actors at the Arkansas Territorial Restoration. P,M,S

Gerstackers Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Museum of Science and History, 1988.) 20 minute video. Dramatic re-enactment of German explorer Friederich Gerstackers travels through Arkansas, when it was still a wilderness. Adapted from his 1843 account of his Arkansas adventures Wild Sports in the Far West. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

James McVicar. (Little Rock: ATR, 1994.)10 minute video portrays James McVicar, a wagontrain boss, at the ATR. M,S

Luther. (Little Rock: ATR, 199.) 10 minute video. Luther was a slave of James McVicar. He recalls the conflicts about slaves learning to read and write. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

Statehood - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Archeological Survey, P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, or call (501) 575-3556 for the closest field office near you. There are full-time archeologists at nine research stations across the state. For publication lists, information, or inquiries about the program and volunteering, call the research station in Fayetteville.

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Arkansas Archeology: Guide to Sites, Parks and Museums. Write P.O. Box 1249, Fayetteville, AR 72702-1249, or call (501) 575-3556 for more information on research stations, publication lists, and volunteer programs.

Arkansas Post National Memorial, National Park Service, 1741 Old Post Road, Gillett, AR 72055, or call. (870) 548-2207. Free admission. In the 18th and 19th century, Arkansas post was the major stopping place between St. Louis and New Orleans. It was a bustling river port city when it was bombarded by the Civil War; by the beginning of the 20th century, it was abandoned. The Visitor Center features exhibits and audiovisual programs about French, Spanish and Colonial life. Tours upon request. Speakers available for school visits.

Arkansas State University Museum, Box 490, State University, AR 72467, or call (870) 972-2074. Free admission. Museum features exhibits describing life in northeast Arkansas.

Arkansas Territorial Restoration*, 200 East Third Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9351. Visit some of the earliest homes in Arkansas, visitors center, and changing exhibits pertaining to life in Arkansas from 1819 to the early 1860s. Living history characters and craft demonstrations offered regularly. Guided tours available.

Conway Cemetery State Park, Bradley, Arkansas, or call (870) 695-3561, An 11.5 acre site featuring the family cemetery where James S. Conway, Arkansas first governor, is buried. Biographical markers are on the site.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350 Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Fort Smith National Historic Site*, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1406, Fort Smith, AR 72902, or call (501) 783-3961. Admission charged. Visit the military post established in 1817 to keep peace between Cherokee and Osage Indians, reconstructed courtroom, jail and other exhibits.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descenants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old Fort Museum, 320 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith, AR 72901, or call (501) 783-7841. Includes exhibits and artifacts on Fort Smith and Western Arkansas and Indian Territory from territorial times to the present. Also includes working 1930s soda fountain. Various programs available upon request. Free admission to school groups.

Old State House Museum, 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685. Arkansass state capitol building from 1836 to 1911 and the oldest surviving Greek Revival state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Exhibits on Arkansas history. Free admission, tours available.

Old Washington Historic State Park, P.O. Box 98, Washington, AR 71862, or call (870) 983-2684. Thriving antebellum frontier town on the Southwest Trail. Many historic buildings are open for tour.

Plantation Agriculture Museum*, P.O. Box 87, Scott, AR 72142, or call (501) 961-1409. Preserves the states rich heritage of plantation life and cotton agriculture. Exhibits and programs focus on the years 1836-1940 when agriculture practices became mechanized.

Prairie County Museum*, Rt. 2, Box 154, Des Arc, AR 72040, or call (870) 256-3711. Exhibits on the history of Arkansas navigable rivers from 1831-1931. Focuses on rivers as western migration and transportation routes.

Rogers Historical Museum, 322 South Second Street, Rogers, AR 72756, or call (501) 936-5485. Offers extensive educational on-site and outreach programming and loan materials for all ages focusing on the history of northwest Arkansas from 1840-1940. Topics include pioneers, farming and railroads. Other programs available upon request. All services free to school groups.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas.

 

V. Civil War and Reconstruction (1861-1874)

Civil War and Reconstruction - Printed Materials

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The History We Built. (Little Rock: AHPP, 1993.) Booklet features significant sites in Arkansas, including Old Washington Historic District and Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park. M,S

Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism. Red River Campaign in Arkansas. (Little Rock: The Department, 1989.) Pamphlet detailing the Arkansas portion of this Civil War campaign. M,S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Atkinson, James H. Forty Days of Disaster: The Story of General Frederick Steeles Expedition into Southern Arkansas, March 23 to May 3, 1864. (Little Rock: Pulaski County Historical Society, 1955.) Good primary sources. M,S

Baker, Lea Flowers and Don Montgomery. Battle of Prairie Grove Lesson Plan.* (Jackdaw Publishers, 1997.) 1-800-789-0022. M,S

Banasik, Michael. Embattled Arkansas: The Prairie Grove Campaign of 182. (Wilmington, NC: Broadfoot Publishers, 1996.) A massive book with detailed description. S

Bearss, Edwin C. Steeles Retreat From Camden and the Battle of Jenkins Ferry. (Little Rock: Pioneer Press, 1969.) S Focuses on General Frederick Steele and the Red River Campaign.

_____. "The Battle of Helena, July 4, 1863." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XX (Autumn 1961), 256-297. A straightforward account of an ill-planned battle fought to save Vicksburg. S

_____. "The Battle of Pea Ridge." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XX (Spring 1961), 74-94. A survey based primarily on the Official Records. M,S

_____. "The Battle of the Post of Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XVIII (Autumn 1959), 237-279. Detailed account of the 1863 Civil War engagement. M,S

Brown, Walter L. "Pea Ridge: Gettysburg of the West." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XV (Spring 1956), 3-16. A useful survey even if the thesis cannot be sustained. S

Burnside, William H. The Honorable Powell Clayton. (Conway: University of Central Arkansas, 1991.) An overview. S

Carrigan, Jo Ann. "Nineteenth-Century Rural Self-Sufficiency." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXI (Summer 1962), 132-145. A survey of home remedies and folk practices. M,S

Christ, Mark, editor. Rugged and Sublime: The Civil War in Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) A good overview of the Civil War in the state. S

Clayton, Powell. Aftermath of the Civil War in Arkansas. (New York: Neale Publishing, 1915. Reprinted Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1985.) A good memoir by a Union commander and Reconstruction governor. S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Delta Cultural Center. Floods, Mud, Trains, and Cotton, the Delta: Arkansas Land of Riches. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, nd.) A small booklet on the Deltas geography and its people and industry. P,M

_____. A Land Promised: Immigrants in the Arkansas Delta. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Beginning in the 1840s and continuing to the early twentieth century, different ethnic groups immigrated to the Arkansas Delta. M,S

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanities Council. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Regnat Populus: The 19th Century Governors of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Brief biographies of governors of the state during the 1800s. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

_____. Stonewall of the West: General Patrick R. Cleburne. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Brief biography of the Irish-born Helena native, killed at the Battle of Franklin in 1864. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

_____. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 374-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Dougan, Michael B. Confederate Arkansas: The People and Policies of a Frontier State in Wartime. (University, AL: University of Alabama Press, 1976.) S

_____. Confederate Women of Arkansas. (Original imprint Reprint: Fayetteville: M & M Press, 1993.) This revised edition includes a new introduction by Professor Micael B. Dougan. S

Ferguson, John L. Arkansas and the Civil War. (Little Rock: Pioneer Press, 1964.) Though superceded, this still has some useful information. M,S

Finley, Randy. From Slavery to Uncertain Freedom: The Freedmens Bureau in Arkansas, 1865-1869. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996) S

Fischer, Leroy H. "David O. Dodd: Folk Hero of Confederate Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXVII (Summer 1978), 130-146. A folk hero, yes, but Fischer found feet of clay on the boy hero and martyr. S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas: Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) M,S

Glover, Robert W., editor. "The War Letters of a Texas Conscript." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XX (Winter 1961), 355-387. Delightfully candid accounts of Arkansas conditions by a less-than-enthusiastic conscript. S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Harbour, Don. "A Stagecoach Robbery." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) A stagecoach robbery outside of Hot Springs in 1874 is recounted with the James Gang being tied to the crime. M,S

Harrell, John M. The Brooks and Baxter War: A History of the Reconstruction Period in Arkansas. (St. Louis: Slawson Printing, 1893.) A conservative interpretation. S

Huff, Leo. "Guerrillas, Jayhawkers and Bushwhackers in Northern Arkansas During the Civil War." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXIV (Summer 1965), 127-148. A comprehensive overview of these three diverse but often conflated groups. S

Johnson, Boyd W. "Cullen Montgomery Baker, the Arkansas-Texas Desperado." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXV (Autumn 1966), 229-239. A sketch of the life of a notorious border badman who seems to have killed blacks for the fun of it in Reconstruction Arkansas. S

Jones, Douglas C. The Barefoot Brigade. (NY: Holt, Rhinehart, Winston, 1982.) Fiction, but with good descriptive narrative. M,S

_____. Elkhorn Tavern. (NY: Holt, Rhinehart, Winston, 1980.) An historical novel from a writer from Washington County. S

Lancaster, Bob. "The Camden Expedition." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Story of General Frederick Steeles 1864 Civil War expedition. M,S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Moneyhon, Carl, editor. "Life in Confederate Arkansas: The Diary of Virginia Davis Gray." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLII (Spring 1983), 47-85; (Summer 1983), 134-169. The quite literate record of a Princeton woman covering the latter stages of the Civil War from the vantage point of Dallas County. M,S

Monnett, Howard N., editor. "A Yankee Cavalryman Views the Battle of Prairie Grove." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXI (Winter 1962), 289-204. M,S

Nash, Horace D. "Blacks in Arkansas During Reconstruction: The Ex-Slave Narratives." Arkansas Historical QuarterlyXLVIII (Autumn 1989), 243-259. Although WPA interviewees were asked to talk about slavery in the good old days, a number carried their often poignant stories into the Reconstruction era. S

Neal, Diane and Thomas W. Kremm. Lion of the South: General Thomas C. Hindman. (Macon, GA: Mercer University Press, 1993.) S

ODonnell, William. Civil War Quadrennium: A Narrative History of Day to Day Life in Little Rock During the War Between the States. (Little Rock: Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas, 1985.) M,S

Old State House Museum. Arkansas Past and Present Activity Book. (Little Rock: Old State House Museum, 1994.) (P,M)

_____. Old State House News. (Back issues include, Nineteenth Century Arkansas, Spring 1984; People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We Lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995; Civil War in Arkansas, 1861-1865, Spring 1997.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501) 324-9685 for a copy.

Owings, Richard. "A Battle in the Streets." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Brooks-Baxter War. M,S

Pea Ridge National Military Park. Battle of Pea Ridge Teachers Guide and Lesson Plans. (Pea Ridge, AR: The Park, ca. 1995.) Ask to receive the parks bi-yearly newsletter, The Sentry. P,M,S

"Riding the Rails." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Article on the Little Rock and Memphis Railroad. M,S

Roberts, Bobby and Carl Moneyhon. Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Arkansas in the Civil War. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1987.) M,S A revised edition is in the works.

Rothrock, Thomas. "Joseph Carter Corbin and Negro Education in the University of Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXX (Autumn 1971), 277-314. A useful introduction to the history of the black campus located at Pine Bluff. S

Shea, William L. and Earl J. Hess. Pea Ridge: Civil War Campaign in the West. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992.) S Good in-depth analysis of the battle. S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to the present. M,S

Sutherland, Daniel E. "Guerrillas: The Real War in Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, LII (Autumn 1993), 257-285. Finally, someone has carefully studied the irregulars who made life miserable for Arkansans on both sides during the Civil War. S

Smith, John I. The Courage of a Southern Unionist: A Biography of Isaac Murphy. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1983.) S Murphy was the Unionist Governor of Arkansas when the state fell to Union forces.

_____. Forward From Rebellion: Reconstruction and Revolution in Arkansas, 1868-1874. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1983.)

Staples, Thomas S. Reconstruction in Arkansas, 1862-1874. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1923.) S A conservative appraisal.

Sutherland, Daniel E. Reminiscences of a Private: William E. Bevens of the First Arkansas Infantry, C.S.A. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1992) S

Symonds, Craig L. Stonewall of the West: Patrick Cleburne and the Civil War. (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1997.) S

Woodward, Earl F. "The Brooks and Baxter War in Arkansas, 1872-1874." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXX (Winter 1971), 315-336. A convenient summary of the end of Reconstruction in Arkansas. M,S

Civil War and Reconstruction - Media

Arkansas Constitution of 1874. Web site. www.wlj.com/cnconst2.htm

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage: 1865-1917. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984.) 45 minute video or filmstrip. Program on outstanding architecture in Arkansas. Emphasis on the building boom that followed the Civil War and impact of rail traffic and industrialism in the state. M,S

Battle of Prairie Grove. (Conway: AETN, nd.) No time indicated. Video. This is a dramatic re-enactment of the Battle of Prairie grove, December 7, 1862. S

Brooks-Baxter War. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. An overview of the causes of results of the Reconstruction-era "war." M,S

Civil War in Arkansas. Web site. www.civilwarbuff.org

Civil War Trust. Web site. www.civilwar.org

Confederate Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Program recreates the surrender of the arsenal at Little Rock, the Battle of Pea Ridge, and daily lives of soldiers. S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

The Edge of Conflict: Arkansas in the Civil War. (Conway: AETN, 1995.) 90 minute video. Documents Arkansas in the Civil War. Educational guide includes lesson plans and primary materials. S

Jacksonport Round the Bend. (Conway: AETN, nd.) No time indicated. Video. A historical Civil War background is recreated in this guided tour of the Jacksonport State Park. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

In Dreadful Conflict: The Civil War in Northwest Arkansas. (Springdale: Shiloh Museum, 1991.) No time indicated. Video. Examines the Civil War with special emphasis on Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove. S

National Park Service. Web site. www.nps.gov

Pea Ridge Campaign of 1862: The Civil War Enters Arkansas. (Kansas City: VideoPost, ca1997.) 40 minute video. Includes both battle re-enactments and archival photographs. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

Wilsons Creek: The Struggle for Missouri Begins. (Kansas City: VideoPost, ca1997.) 45 minute video. Includes both battle re-enactments and archival photographs. M,S

Civil War and Reconstruction - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Post Naional Memorial, National Park Service, 1741 Old Post Road, Gillett, AR 72055, or call. (870) 548-2207. Free admission. In the 18th and 19th century, Arkansas post was the major stopping place between St. Louis and New Orleans. It was a bustling river port city when it was bombarded by the Civil War; by the beginning of the 20th century, it was abandoned. The Visitor Center features exhibits and audiovisual programs about French, Spanish and Colonial life. Tours upon request.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Jacksonport State Park*, P.O. Box 8, Jacksonport, AR 72075, or call (870) 523-2143. Focuses on life as an early Arkansas steamboat port and river settlement. During the Civil War it was occupied by both Confederate and Union armies. Five Major Generals used the town as their headquarters. Tours of the 1869 Courthouse (featuring exhibits on area history) and Mary Woods No. 2, a rehabilitated White River sternwheel steamboat available. Buildings are closed until Fall 1999 for renovations.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old Fort Museum, 320 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith, AR 72901, or call (501) 783-7841. Includes exhibits and artifacts on Fort Smith and Western Arkansas and Indian Territory from territorial times to the present. Also includes working 1930s soda fountain. Various programs available upon request. Free admission to school groups.

Old State House Museum, 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685. Arkansass state capitol building from 1836 to 1911 and the oldest surviving Greek Revival state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Exhibits on Arkansas history. Free admission, tours available. Pick up or make arrangements through CO-OP

Old Washington Historic State Park, P.O. Box 98, Washington, AR 71862, or call (870)983-2684. Thriving antebellum frontier town on the Southwest Trail. Many historic buildings are open for tour. Will provide special programs and speakers.

Pea Ridge National Military Park*, P.O. Box 700, Pea Ridge, AR 72751, or call (501) 451-8122. Site of March 1862 battle that helped establish Union control of northwestern Arkansas during the Civil War.

Plantation Agriculture Museum*, P.O. Box 87, Scott, AR 72142, or call (501) 961-1409. Preserves the states rich heritage of plantation life and cotton agriculture. Exhibits and programs focus on the years 1836-1940 when agriculture practices became mechanized.

Prairie County Museum*, Rt. 2, Box 154, Des Arc, AR 72040, or call (870) 256-3711. Exhibits on the history of Arkansas navigable rivers from 1831-1931. Focuses on rivers as western migration and transportation routes.

Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park, P.O. Box 306, Prairie Grove, AR 72753, or call (501) 846-2990. Site of important December 1862 battle. Admission charged for museum, audiovisual programs and guided tours.

Rogers Historical Museum, 322 South Second Street, Rogers, AR 72756, or call (501) 936-5485. Offers extensive educational on-site and outreach programming and loan materials for all ages focusing on the history of northwest Arkansas from 1840-1940. Topics include pioneers, farming and railroads. Other programs available upon request. All services free to school groups.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of nothwest Arkansas.

 

VI. The New South (1874-1900)

The New South - Printed Materials

Allured, Janet L. "Ozark Women and the Companionate Family in the Arkansas Hills, 1870-1910." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLVII (Autumn 1988), 230-256. A detailed study of Boone County family life reveals a mixture of Ozark traditionalism and Victorian influences. S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Besancon-Alford, Julia G. "The History of Marche, Arkansas." Pulaski County Historical Review, XLI (Winter 1993), 78-90. An interesting study of a Polish immigrant community near North Little Rock. S

Bolsterli, Margaret Jones, editor. Vinegar Pie and Chicken Bread: A Womans Diary of Life in the Rural South, 1890-1891. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1983.) Nannie Stillwell Jackson recorded her life on a farm. M,S

Brown, C. Allan. "At the End of the Line." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) A brief history of trolleys and urban amusement parks in Arkansas. M,S

Center for Arkansas Studies, University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Judge Parkers Court: Law and Order on the Frontier. (Little Rock: The Center, nd.) Booklet on Judge Parker. M,S

Chesnutt, E.F. "Little Rock Gets Electric Lights." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLII (Autumn 1983), 239-253. The convoluted story of the arrival of an important utility in the states capital. M,S

Craig, Shannon K. Arkansas and Foreign Immigration, 1890-1915. (Masters thesis, University of Arkansas, 1979.) A good introduction to the immigration to the state. S

Daggett, Mala, editor. Victorian Arkansas: How They Lived and Played. * (Little Rock: Old State House Museum, 1981.) Filled with loads of activities on Arkansas Victorian culture. P,M,S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Delta Cultural Center. Floods, Mud, Trains, and Cotton, the Delta: Arkansas Land of Riches. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, nd.) A small booklet on the Deltas geography and its people and industry. P,M

Delta Cultural Center. A Land Promised: Immigrants in the Arkansas Delta. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Beginning in the 1840s and continuing to the early twentieth century, ethnic groups immigrated to the Arkansas Delta. M,S

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanites Council. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Regnat Populus: The 19th Century Governors of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) Brief biographies of governors of the state during the 1800s. Contact the Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. M,S

_____. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501) 374-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas: Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) Biographies of the states governors. M,S

Graves, John W. Town and Country: Race Relations in an Urban-Rural Context, Arkansas 1865-1905. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1990.) The source for race relations in the New South. M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Leslie, James W. "Ferd Havis: Jefferson Countys Black Republican Leader." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXX VII (Autumn 1978), 240-251. This late nineteenth-century black had tremendous political power before the onset of segregation; a useful sketch. M,S

Lewellen, Jeffrey. "Sheep Amidst the Wolves: Father Bandini and the Colony at Tontitown, 1898-1917." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLV (Spring 1986), 19-40. A well-documented story of how the Italian sheep fought back against local Protestant wolves. S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Moneyhon, Carl. Arkansas and the New South, 1874-1929. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) History of the economic and social change from the end of Reconstruction to the Great Depression. S

Moore, Waddy W. Arkansas in the Gilded Age, 1874-1900. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1976.) A collection of articles on the mainly political scene in the New South. M,S

Morgan, Gordon O. and Peter Kunkel. "Arkansas Ozark Mountain Blacks: An Introduction." Phylon, XXXIV (September 1973), 282-288. The emphasis is on a settlement in Independence County. M,S

Morgan, James L. "She Put Newport on the Map: A Biography of Aunt Carolyn Dye." Stream of History, V (January 1967), 17-18, 28-32. Carolyn Dye was a seer who drew large crowds of both blacks and whites. M,S

Old State House Museum. Old State House News. (Back issues include, Nineteenth Century Arkansas, Spring 1984; People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We Lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995.)

Portis, Charles. True Grit. (NY: NAL Penguin, 1968.) Reprinted numerous times. An outstanding novel which deals with the era of Isaac Parker, the "Hanging Judge". M,S

Propps, J.J. "My Childhood and Youth in Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXVI (Winter 1967), 310-352. The author, a Howard County native born in 1886, recalled rural ways before the coming of major modernization; topics include education, religion, hunting, farming, and home ways. M,S

Sarna, Jan, editor. "Marche, Arkansas: A Personal Reminiscence of Life and Customs." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXVI (Spring 1977), 31-49. A variety of interviews nd newspaper accounts of a Pulaski County community north of Little Rock. M,S

Shirley, Glenn. Belle Starr and Her Times: The Literature, The Facts, and the Legends. (Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1982.) The definitive work on Belle Starr. S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to the present. M,S

Thompson, Robert. "Racial Progress Grinds to a Halt." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Separate coach laws went into effect in 1891. M,S

Watkins, Beverly. Efforts to Encourage Immigration to Arkansas, 1865-1874. (Masters thesis, Auburn University, 1975.) This is a good source attracting immigrants to the state. S

The New South - Media

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage: 1865-1917. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984.) 45 minute video or filmstrip. Program on outstanding architecture in Arkansas. Emphasis on the building boom that followed the Civil War and impact of rail traffic and industrialism in the st ate. M,S

Arkansas Music. (Conway: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Allows students to experience the wide scope of Arkansas music from folk to Negro spiritual to jazz. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

Hell on the Border: The Story of Fort Smith. (Little Rock: Museum of Science and History, nd.) 30 minute video. The story of Judge Isaac Parker and law in the west. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

Stuttgart: A Farming Heritage. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Documents the German and farming heritage in Stuttgart. M,S

When You Make a Good Crop: Italians in the Delta. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 28 minute video. This film explores the heritage of Delta Italians and beginnings on 1890s plantations. S

The New South - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Forestry Commission. Educational materials and programs are available by contacting 3821 West Roosevelt, Little Rock, AR 72204-6396 or call (501) 664-2531. Protects and develops forest resources for the state.

Arkansas Geological Commission, 3815 West Roosevelt, Little Rock, AR 72204, or call (501) 296-1877.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Fort Smith National Historic Site *, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1406, Fort Smith, AR 72902, or call (501) 783-3961. Visit Judge Isaac Parkers courtroom.

Fort Smith Trolley Museum*. Call (501) 783-0205 or (501) 783-7841. Working trolleys interpret the years from 1883-1933 when trolleys ran in Fort Smith and other Arkansas towns.

Hot Springs National Park, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs, AR 71902, or call (501) 624-3383. Bathhouse Row found its fame during this era.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old Fort Museum, 320 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith, AR 72901, (501) 783-7841. Includes exhibits and artifacts on Fort Smith and Western Arkansas and Indian Territory from territorial times to present. Also includes working 1930s soda sountain. Various programs available upon request. Free admission to school groups.

Old State House Museum, 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685. Arkansass state capitol building from 1836 to 1911 and the oldest surviving Greek Revival state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Exhibits on Arkansas history. Site of the Brooks-Baxter War in 1874.

Plantation Agriculture Museum*, P.O. Box 87, Scott, AR 72142, or call (501) 961-1409. Preserves the states rich heritage of plantation life and cotton agriculture. Exhibits and programs focus on the years 1836-1940 when agriculture practices became mechanized.

Rogers Historical Museum, 322 South Second Street, Rogers, AR 72756, or call (501) 936-5485. Offers extensive educational on-site and outreach programming and loan materials for all ages focusing on the history of northwest Arkansas from 1840-1940. Topics include pioneers, farming and railroads. Other programs available upon request. All services free to school groups.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas.

Stuttgart Agriculture Museum, 921 East 4th Street, Stuttgart, AR 72160, or call (870) 673-7001. Exhibits and programs focusing on the history of agriculture and farm life from the late 1800s to 1940s on the Arkansas Grand Prairie. Tours and special programs available upon request.

Texarkana Museums System, Ace of Clubs House*, P.O. Box 2343, Texarkana, USA 75504, or call (903) 793-4831. Restored 1885 Victorian house museum focusing on life in southwest Arkansas/northeast Texas from 1885-1940s. Tours available.

 

VII. Progressive Era through World War I ( 1900-1918 )

Progressive Era through World War I - Printed Materials

Allured, Janet L. "Ozark Women and the Companionate Family in the Arkansas Hills, 1870-1910." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLVII (Autumn 1988), 230-256. A detailed study of Boone County family life reveals a mixture of Ozark traditionalism and Victorian influences. S

Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department. Historical Review: Arkansas State Highway Commission and Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department, 1913-1992. (Little Rock: The Department, 1992.) Basically, a history of transportation in Arkansas during the 20th century. M,S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Arsenault, Raymond. The Wild Ass of the Ozarks: Jeff Davis and the Social Bases of Southern Politics. (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1984. Reprinted Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1988.) A introductory biography to Davis. S

Cochran, Robert. Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) Brief biographies of musicians from Arkansas. M,S

Dale, Gary R. Adventures in Arkansas History: Life on the Farm. (Little Rock: Arkansas Farm Bureau Federation, 1995.) The series has activities for all grade levels. P,M,S

Delta Cultural Center. Floods, Mud, Trains, and Cotton, the Delta: Arkansas Land of Riches. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, nd.) A small booklet on the Deltas geography and its people and industry. P,M

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 374-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Dew, Lee A. "On a Slow Train Through Arkansaw--The Negative Image of Arkansas in the Early Twentieth Century." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXIX (Summer 1980), 125-135. An image study focusing on Arkansas relation to technology. S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Donaghey, George W. Building a State Capitol. (Little Rock: Parke-Harper, 1937.) Documents Donagheys role in building the capitol. M,S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas: Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) M,S

Hanley, Steven and Ray Hanley. "Wish You Were Here:" Arkansas Postcard Past, 1900-1925. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) The authors tried to include a postcard from each county. M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Histoical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Harrell, Don. "One Last Picture of Bob Jackson." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Brief biography of one of the Arkansas casualties in World War I. M,S

House, Boyce. "A Small Arkansas Town 50 Years Ago." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XVIII (Autumn 1959), 291-307; "In a Little Town, Long Ago." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XIX (Summer 1960), 151-168. One of the best accounts of urban life, Brinkley being the town in question. M,S

Lancaster, Bob. "Fighting Hookworm." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) The battle to eradicate hookworm was fought long and hard. M,S

_____. "Pike Countys Sparkling Lode." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Diamonds are discovered by John Wesley Huddleston in 1906 at Murfreesboro. M,S

Ledbetter, Calvin R. Carpenter from Conway: George Washington Donaghey as Governor of Arkansas, 1909-1913. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993.) Donaghey oversaw the completion of the construction of the Arkansas State Capitol. S

Lewellen, Jeffrey. "Sheep Amidst the Wolves: Father Bandini and the Colony at Tontitown, 1898-1917." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLV (Spring 1986), 19-40. A well-documented story of how the Italian sheep fought back against local Protestant wolves. S

Lisenby, Foy. Charles Hillman Brough: A Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) The only biography on Brough. M,S

MacFarland, John David, III. Stone Used in the Construction of the Arkansas State Capitol Building. (Little Rock: Arkansas Geological Commission, ca. 1982) Pamphlet. P,M,S

McCarty, Joey. "The Red Scare in Arkansas: A Southern State and National Hysteria." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXVII (Autumn 1978), 264-277. Finding Bolsheviks everywhere, especially in race relations, white Arkansans had a frightful time of it after World War I. S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Niswonger, Richard. Arkansas Democratic Politics, 1886-1920. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1990.) An account of the political scene during the period after Reconstruction. S

Old State House News. Mock newspaper of actual events. Contact the Old State House for available back issues.

Paul, David. "Who Murdered Amanda Stevens?" Arkansas Times, XII (October 1985), 102-108. The trial and hanging (July 15, 1914) of Arthur Tillman; he was the last man to be hanged before electrocution became the legal means of execution. S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas.* (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 19__.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. M,S

Propps, J.J. "My Childhood and Youth in Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXVI (Winter 1967), 310-352. The author, a Howard County native born in 1886, recalls rural ways before the coming of major modernization; topics include education, religion, hunting, farming, and home ways. M,S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to the present. M,S

Smith, Kenneth. Sawmill: The Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest East of the Rockies. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) The story of the lmber industry in Arkansas.

Still, William Grant. "My Arkansas Boyhood." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXVI (Autumn 1967), 285-292. The prominent black composer recalled with some fondness his childhood days in Little Rock. M,S

Treon, John A. "Politics and Concrete: The Building of the Arkansas State Capitol, 1899-1917." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXI (Summer 1972), 99-133. Treachery, scandal, and some fraud underlay the building of the current state capitol. S

Weller, Cecil Edward. Joe T. Robinson: Always a Loyal Democrat. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1998.) The definitive biography of the Governor and Senator. S

Wheeler, Elizabeth L. "Isaac Fisher: The Frustrations of a Negro Educator at Branch Normal College, 1902-1911." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLI (Spring 1982), 3-50. The fate of black higher education in the age of segregation is illustrated in this biographical study. M,S

Progressive Era through World War I - Media

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage: 1865-1917. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984.) 45 minute video or filmstrip. Program on outstanding architecture in Arkansas. Emphasis on the building boom that followed the Civil War and impact of rail traffic and industrialism in the state. M,S

Arkansas Music. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Allows students to experience the wide scope of Arkansas music from folk to Negro spiritual to jazz. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

From Jennies to Jets and Beyond. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. This program follows the aviation time line from aviation oddities to NASAs space shuttle, the Enterprise. Arkansas aviation pioneers are featured. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present. Study guide available. M,S

Stuttgart: A Farming Heritage. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Documents the German and farming heritage in Stuttgart. M,S

Progressive Era through World War I - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350 Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request. Admission free.

Fort Smith Trolley Museum*. Call (501) 783-0205 or (501) 783-7841. Working trolleys interpret the years from 1883-1933 when trolleys ran in Fort Smith and other Arkansas towns.

Herman Davis Memorial State Park. Davis was from Manila, Mississippi County and on the list of the top 100 soldiers of World War I.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Plantation Agriculture Museum*, P.O. Box 87, Scott, AR 72142, or call (501) 961-1409. Preserves the states rich heritage of plantation life and cotton agriculture. Exhibits and programs focus on the years 1836-1940 when agriculture practices became mechanized.

Prairie County Museum*, Rt. 2, Box 154, Des Arc, AR 72040, or call (870) 256-3711. Exhibits on the history of Arkansas navigable rivers from 1831-1931. Focuses on rivers as western migration and transportation routes.

Rogers Historical Museum, 322 South Second Street, Rogers, AR 72756, (501) 936-5485. Offers extensive educational on-site and outreach programming and loan materials for all ages focusing on the history of northwest Arkansas from 1840-1940. Topics include pioneers, farming and railroads. Other programs upon request. Services free to school groups.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas.

Stuttgart Agriculture Museum, 921 East 4th Street, Stuttgart, AR 72160, or call (870) 673-7001. Exhibits and programs focusing on the history of agriculture and farm life from the late 1800s to 1940s on the Arkansas Grand Prairie. Tours and special programs available upon request.

Texarkana Museums System, Ace of Clubs House*, P.O. Box 2343, Texarkana, USA 75504, or call (903) 793-4831. Restored 1885 Victorian house museum focusing on life in southwest Arkansas/northeast Texas from 1885-1940s. Tours available.

 

VIII. Roaring 20s through World War II (1918-1945)

Roaring 20s through World War II - Printed Materials

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plns are worth looking for. P,M,S

Alexander, Charles C. The Ku Klux Klan in the Southwest. (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1965.) The KKK came to its prominence in the 1920, which the womens auxiliary headquarters was in Little Rock. S

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The History We Built. (Little Rock: AHPP, 1993.) Booklet features significant sites in Arkansas, including Rohwer Relocation Center Site. M,S.

Bearden, Russell. "Jefferson Countys Worst Disaster: The Flood of 1927." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLIII (Winter 1984), 324-338. Although focusing on local reaction to the flood, this article is a good example of the regional impact of the disaster.

Brantley, Janet G. Homes for Victory: Defense Housing in Southwest Arkansas During World War II. (Texarkana: Texarkana Museums System, ca1995.) M,S

Center for Arkansas Studies, University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Hard Times: Rural Life in the Depression. (Little Rock: The Center, 19--.) M,S

Cochran, Robert B. "All the Songs in the World: The Story of Emma Dusenbury." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLIV (Spring 1985), 3-15. Arkansas most famous folksinger was a blind welfare recipient. S

_____. Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) Brief biographies of musicians from Arkansas. M,S

Dale, Gary R. Adventures in Arkansas History: Life on the Farm. (Little Rock: Arkansas Farm Bureau Federation, 1992.) P,M

Daniels, Pete. Deepn As It Comes: The 1927 Mississippi River Flood. (NY: Oxford University Press, 1977. Reprinted Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) The standard account of the flood. M,S

Daughters of the American Revolution, Arkansas State Society. Life in Arkansas: The First 100 Years. (Little Rock: The Society, 1985.) Photographs. P,M,S

Davis, Daniel S. Behind Barbed Wire: Imprisonment of Japanese Americans During World War II. (NY: Dutton, 1982.) Two Relocation Centers were in Jerome and Rohwer in Southeast Arkansas. S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Delta Cultural Center. The Arkansas Delta: A Historical Look at Our Land and People. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1990.) Documents development and settlement of the delta region. M,S

_____. The Arkansas Delta: A Landscape of Change. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1990.) Documents development and settlement of the delta region of Arkansas. Companion to an exhibit produced by the Arkansas Humanities Council. Small fee. M,S

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanities Council. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 374-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Fitzjarrald, Sarah. "Alphonso Trent--One of the Best." Fort Smith Historical Society Journal, VII (April 1984), 3-6. Brief, well-illustrated account of a famous jazz musician, born in Fort Smith in 1905 and died in 1959. M,S

Fletcher, John Gould. Life Is My Song. (NY: Farrar & Rinehart, 1937. Reprinted as The Autobiography of John Gould Fletcher. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988.) Fletcher was the Pulitzer Prize winner for poetry 1939. M,S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas:Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) M,S

Gibbens, Jerry D. "The Short Violent Life of Tom Slaughter, Con Man, Killer, Celebrity." The Record, XXXIV (1993), 53-63. An incredible account of a daring criminal who on one occasion took control of the state prison. M,S

Goldstein, Donald M. and Katherine V. Dillon. The Williwaw War: The Arkansas National Guard in the Aleutians in World War II. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1992.) The National Guard fought in the war. S

Gordon, Fon L. "Black Women in Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXV (Summer 1987), 26-37. Useful information on a neglected topic. M,S

Greene, Bette. The Summer of My German Soldier. (NY: Dial Press, 1973.) A novel, but rich in historical information about German Prisoners of War housed in Arkansas. M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Harris, Peggy. "Homemaker to Homeowner: Little Rock Women in the 1920s." Pulaski County Historical Review, XXXIX (Summer 1991), 26-36. Evidence of economic activity by women. S

Holley, Donald. "The Second Great Emancipation: The Rust Cotton Picker and How It Changed Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, LII (Spring 1993), 44-77. Excellent study on Arkansas farming, 1949, 1970. S

_____. Uncle Sams Farmers: The New Deal Communities in the Lower Mississippi Valley. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1975.) Talks about the establishment of federally funded communities, such as Dyess in Mississippi County. S

Johnson, Ben F. III. Fierce Solitude: A Life of John Gould Fletcher. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) Biography. S

Kincaid, Diane, editor. Silent Hattie Speaks: The Personal Journal of Senator Hattie Caraway. (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1977.) Caraway was the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate from Arkansas. S

Lancaster, Bob. "Horrors in Elaine." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Story of the Elaine Race Riot in 1919. M,S

_____. "The States First National Leader." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Joe T. Robinson was the 1928 Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate. M,S

Lenski, Lois. Cotton in My Sack. (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1949.) Childrens novel of share-cropping in Mississippi County. P,M

Leveritt, Mara. "The Deadly Dagger." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Women were granted the right to vote in 1919. S

Malone, David. Hattie and Huey: An Arkansas Tour. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1989.) The Louisiana Senator Huey Long helped get Caraway elected. M,S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Miller, Leon C. "Little Rocks Golden Calf: The Jazz Age Baseball Battle in Pulaski County." Pulaski County Historical Review, XXXVI (Spring 1988), 2-18. Fine account of the controversy over Sunday afternoon baseball. M,S

Nichols, Cheryl G. "Pulaski Heights: Early Suburban Development in Little Rock, Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLI (Summer 1982), 129-145. This turn-of-the-century development became Arkansas best example of a streetcar suburb. M,S

Obrecht, John. "The England Food Riot" Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) The riot occurred in England, Arkansas in 1931. M,S

Old State House. Old State House News. (Back issues include, Arkansas, 1900-1920, Fall 1984; People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We Lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995.) Mock newspaper of actual events. Contact for available back issues. P,M,S

Pritchett, Merrill and William L. Shea. "The Afrika Korps in Arkansas, 1943-1946." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XXXVII (Spring 1978), 3-22. Arkansas received a large number of German war prisoners who had interesting experiences in the state. S

Rinne, Henry Q. "A Short History of the Alphonso Trent Orchestra." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XLV (Autumn 1986), 228-249. A black group active in Texas and the Southwest during the 1920s and 1930s. M,S

Ross, Margaret. "Herman Davis: Forgotten Hero." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, XIV (Spring 1955), 51-61. Swamp boy who became a World War I hero. M,S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to the present. M,S

Smith, C. Calvin. War and Wartime Changes: The Transformation of Arkansas, 1940-1945. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1987.) Details how World War II changed the state. S

Smith, William M, Jr. "The Right Plane at the Wrong Time: A Brief History of the Command-Aire Aircraft Company." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, LI (Autumn 1992), 224-246. From 1926 to 1930 Little Rock boasted an airplane factory. M,S

Stuck, Dorothy D. and Nan Snow. Roberta: A Most Remarkable Fulbright. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) The mother of J. William Fulbright, the mother of the powerful senator. She was also instrumental "petticoat government" in Winslow. S

Takei, George. To the Stars: The Autobiography of George Takei, Star Treks Mr. Sulu. (NY: Pocket Books, 1994.) The author was an internee at the Rohwer Japanese Relocation Camp. M,S

Vanderpool, Guy C. All Together Now: The Arkansas Home Front During World War II. (Texarkana: Texarkana Museums System, 1995.) How Southwest Arkansas pulled together during the War. M,S

Whayne, Jeannie M., editor. Shadows Over Sunnyside: An Arkansas Plantation in Transition, 1830-1945. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas, 1993.) A study of the Italian sharecroppers in the Delta. S

Weglyn, Michi. Years of Infamy: The Untold Story of Americas Concentration Camps. (NY: Morrow, 1976.) The story of Japanese Relocation. S

Wilson, Stephen. Harvey Couch: An Entrepreneur Brings Electricity to Arkansas. (Little Rock: August House, 1986.) Couch was the founder of A P & L. M,S

Work Will Win: Teachers Guide. (Brinkley: Fargo Agricultural Museum, ca1996.) Lesson plans on the history of the school. P,M,S

Roaring 20s through World War II - Media

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage, 1918-Present. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984. ) 45 minute video or filmstrip. Program traces the legacy of building from World War II to present. M,S

Arkansas Music. (Conway: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Allows students to experience the wide scope of Arkansas music from folk to Negro spiritual to jazz. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

Depression Years. (Conway: AETN, 1977.) No time indicated. Video. Arkansas during the Great Depression. M,S

From Jennies to Jets and Beyond. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. This program follows the aviation time line from aviation oddities to NASAs space shuttle, the Enterprise. Arkansas aviation pioneers are featured. M,S

Hattie W. Caraway. (Conway: AETN, 1994.) 13 minute video. Brief biography of the first woman elected senator. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

Jerome/Rohwer. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1980.) Slides. Includes three carousels of slides from the National Archives. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

A Place Called Rohwer. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1978.) Exhibit. Comprised of 12 framed photographs of the Japanese-American Internment Camp in Desha County. M,S

A Place Called Rohwer: Memories of Camp Life. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1978.) 30 minute video. Features interviews with former internees. S

Rohwer. (Conway: AETN, 1990.) An update on Sam Yada, who was featured in A Place Called Rohwer: Memories of Camp Life less than a year before his death. M,S

Stuttgart: A Farming Heritage. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Documents the German and farming heritage in Stuttgart. M,S

World War II in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. Documentary on Arkansas participation in the war effort from food stamps to relocation camps. M,S

Work Will Win. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1994.) 25 minutes video. A documentary tracing the creation and development of the Fargo Agricultural School from 1919-1949. The video is available for loan from the Humanities Council or purchase from the Fargo Agricultural School Museum for $20.00 M,S

Roaring 20s through World War II - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, 10324 Interstate 30, P.O. Box 2261, Little Rock, AR 72203, or call (501) 569-2000. Call for class-size set of AHTD highway maps and other information.

Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources*, 3853 Smackover Highway, Smackover, AR 71762, or call (870) 725-2877. Exhibit focus on Arkansas oil and brine industrial history and the social history that accompanied the oil boom of the 1920s.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350 Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Fargo Agricultural School Museum, Rt 2, Box 291, Brinkley, AR 72021, or call (870) 734-4040. Exhibits focus on the history of the school and how African-Arkansans lived and worked in the early 1900s.

Fort Smith Trolley Museum*. Call (501) 783-0205 or (501) 783-7841. Working trolleys interpret the years from 1883-1933 when trolleys ran in Fort Smith and other Arkansas towns.

Hot Springs National Park, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs, AR 71902, (501) 624-3383. Hot Springs heyday was in the 1920s with gambling and horse racing.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old Fort Museum, 320 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith, AR 72901, or call (501) 783-7841. Includes exhibits and artifacts on Fort Smith and Western Arkansas and Indian Territory from territorial times to the present. Also includes working 1930s soda fountain. Various programs available upon request. Free admission to school groups.

Old State House Museum, 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685. Arkansass state capitol building from 1836 to 1911 and the oldest surviving Greek Revival state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Exhibits on Arkansas history. Free admission, tours available.

Pine Bluff/Jefferson County Historical Museum, 201 East 4th Street, Pine Bluff, AR 71601, or call (870) 541-5402. Exhibits focus on the history of Jefferson County. Of statewide interest is information on Miss Willie Hocker, the designer of the Arkansas State Flag.

Plantation Agriculture Museum*, P.O. Box 87, Scott, AR 72142, or call (501) 961-1409. Preserves the states rich heritage of plantation life and cotton agriculture. Exhibits and programs focus on the years 1836-1940 when agriculture practices became mechanized.

Prairie County Museum*, Rt. 2, Box 154, Des Arc, AR 72040, or call (870) 256-3711. Exhibits on the history of Arkansas navigable rivers from 1831-1931. Focuses on rivers as western migration and transportation routes.

Rogers Historical Museum, 322 South Second Street, Rogers, AR 72756, or call (501) 936-5485. Offers extensive educational on-site and outreach programming and loan materials for all ages focusing on the history of northwest Arkansas from 1840-1940. Topics include pioneers, farming and railroads. Other programs available upon request. All services free to school groups.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501) 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of Northwest Arkansas.

Stuttgart Agriculture Museum, 921 East 4th Street, Stuttgart, AR 72160, or call (870) 673-7001. Exhibits and programs focusing on the history of agriculture and farm life from the late 1800s to 1940s on the Arkansas Grand Prairie. Tours and special programs available upon request.

Texarkana Museums System, Ace of Clubs House*, P.O. Box 2343, Texarkana, USA 75504, or call (903) 793-4831. Restored 1885 Vicorian house museum focusing on life in southwest Arkansas/northeast Texas from 1885-1940s. Tours available.

 

IX. Era of Social Change (1945-1969)

Era of Social Change - Printed Materials

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The History We Built. (Little Rock: AHPP, 1993.) Booklet features significant sites in Arkansas, Central High School in Little Rock. M,S

"A Baseline for Civil Rights." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) A brief chronology of the 1957 Central High Crisis. M,S

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Bates, Daisy. The Long Shadow of Little Rock: A Memoir. (NY: David McKay Company, 1962. Reprinted Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) An award winning remembrance by the black female leader during the 1957 integration crisis. M,S

Cochran, Robert. Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) Brief biographies of musicians from Arkansas. M,S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Delta Cultural Center. The Arkansas Delta: A Historical Look at Our Land and People. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1990.) Documents development and settlement of the delta region of Arkansas. Small fee. Write P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. M,S

_____. Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1993.) Documents the history of black Arkansans in the delta. Video and exhibit available from the Arkansas Humanities Council. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 374-9150; info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Faubus, Orval E. Down From the Hills. (Conway: River Road Press, 1980.) Governor Faubus tries to justify his actions during the 1957 crisis. S

_____. Down From the Hills II. (Little Rock: Democrat Printing & Lithographing Company, 1985.) S

Freyer, Tony. The Little Rock Crisis: A Constitutional Interpretation. (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1984.) A scholarlyview of the constitutional issues. S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas: Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) M,S

Hanson, Gerald T. and Carl H. Moneyhon. Historical Atlas of Arkansas. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1989.) Maps dealing with many subjects. P,M,S

Hays, Brooks. Politics Is My Parish: An Autobiography. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981.) Hays was a Congressman from Arkansas who was purged by segregationists during the 1957 Crisis. S

Holley, Donald. "The Second Great Emancipation: The Rust Cotton Picker and How It Changed Arkansas." Arkansas Historical Quarterly, LII (Spring 1993), 44-77. Excellent study on Arkansas farming, 1949, 1970. S

Huckaby, Elizabeth. Crisis at Central High, Little Rock, 1957-1958. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980.) Ms. Huckaby was a Central High employee during the 1957 crisis. S

Lancaster, Bob. "Enter Rockefeller." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) Winthrop Rockefellers 1964 gubernatorial loss to Orval Rockefeller is a pivotal point in Arkansas politics. M,S

Lester, Jim. A Man For Arkansas: Sid McMath and the Southern Reform Tradition. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1976.) A biography of McMath and his policies. S

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Murphy, Sara. Breaking the Silence: The Little Rock Womens Emergency Committee to Open Our Schools. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) The Womens Emergency Committee was instrumental during the 1957 Crisis. S

Old State House Museum. Arkansas Past and Present Activity Book. (Little Rock: Old State House Museum, 1994.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a copy.

_____. Old State House News. (Back issues include, People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We Lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a complimentary copy.

Patillo, Melba. Warriors Dont Cry: A Searing Memoir to Integrate Little Rocks Central High. (NY: Pocket Books, 1993.) A personal account of one of the Little Rock Nine. M,S

Rachino, Jim. Faubus to Bumpers: Arkansas Votes, 1960-1970. (Arkadelphia: Action Research, 1972.) A statistical analysis of the political scene during the decade. M,S

Reed, Roy. Faubus: The Life and Times of an American Prodigal. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1997.) The definitive biography of Faubus. S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to the present. M,S

Smith, Griffin, editor. Front Pages 1957: Pages From the History , the Central High Crisis. (Little Rock: WEHCO Publishing, 1997.) Reprints of the front pages of the Arkansas Democrat and Arkansas Gazette during the desegregation crisis. M,S

Tucker, James Guy. Arkansas Men at War. (Little Rock: Pioneer Press, 1968.) A Vietnam observations by the former governor. One of the few books on the Arkansas participation in Vietnam. S

Urwin, Cathy Kunzinger. Agenda for Reform: Winthrop Rockefeller as Governor of Arkansas, 1967-1971. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1991.) introductory biography to Rockefeller. S

Ward, John L. The Arkansas Rockefeller. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1978.) Ward was Rockefellers right-hand man. M,S

Era of Social Change - Media

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage, 1918-Present. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984. ) 45 minute video or filmstrip. Program traces the legacy of building from World War II to present. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

Eyes on the Prize. Civil War (Blackside Productions. Available through PBS.)

From Jennies to Jets and Beyond. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. This program follows the aviation time line from aviation oddities to NASAs space shuttle, the Enterprise. Arkansas aviation pioneers are featured. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

Era of Social Change - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Aerospace Education Center, 3301 East Roosevelt Road, Little Rock, AR 72206, or call (501) 371-0331. Exhibits focus on aviation and aerospace industries in Arkansas. Includes an IMAX theater.

Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, 10324 Interstate 30, P.O. Box 2261, Little Rock, AR 72203, or call (501) 569-2000. Call for class-size set of AHTD highway maps and other information.

Central High Visitors Center and Museum, 2125 West 14th Street, Little Rock, AR 72202, or call (501) 374-1957. Housed in a renovated Mobil Service station, this museum interprets the civil rights era and the Central High School Crisis of 1957.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhbitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, (501) 750-8165. Exhibits on northwest Arkansas.

 

X. Modern Arkansas (1970-Present)

Modern Arkansas - Printed Materials

Arkansas Studies Lesson Plans For Grades K-12. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Education, 1987.) Although out-of-print, some of the lesson plans are worth looking for. P,M,S

Blair, Diane. Arkansas Politics and Government: Do the People Rule? (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1988.) History of modern political process in Arkansas. S

Brummett, John. "What If I Get the Nomination?" Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) A brief overview of the 1992 Presidential campaign. M,S

Cochran, Robert. Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) Brief biographies of musicians from Arkansas. M,S

Compton, Neil. The Battle For the Buffalo River: A Twentieth-Century Conservation Crisis in the Ozarks. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) An account of the battle for making the Buffalo River the first National River in 1972. S

Dale, Gary R. Adventures in Arkansas History: Life on the Farm. (Little Rock: Arkansas Farm Bureau Federation, 1995.) The series has activities for all grade levels. Contact county Farm Bureau agent for information. P,M,S

DeBoer, Marvin E., editor. Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988) S

Delta Cultural Center. The Arkansas Delta: A Historical Look at Our Land and People. (Helena: Delta Cultural Center, 1990.) Documents development and settlement of the delta region of Arkansas. Small fee. Write P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Womens History Bibliography: 1848-1998. (Little Rock: Department of Arkansas Heritage, 1998.) List of womens history sources, including Arkansas and the United States. Contact Education Coordinator, 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 374-9150; email info@dah.state.ar.us. P,M,S

Dumas, Ernest, editor. The Clintons of Arkansas: An Introduction to Those Who Knew Them Best. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1993.) Reminiscences by friends of the Clintons. S

Gatewood, Willard B. and Jeannie Whayne, editors. Governors of Arkansas:Essays in Political Biography. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.) M,S

Grimes, Margaret. Travel Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, 1996.) Booklet includes lesson plans. P,M,S

LaFollette, Marcel. Creationism, Science and the Law: The Arkansas Case. (Cambridge, MA: Institute of Technology Press, 1983.) The Creation-Science Law of 1982 is reviewed. S

League of Women Voters of Arkansas. Government in Arkansas. (Little Rock: The League, 1976-.) Issued every two years, this guide is an introduction to the legislative process and the government officials. M,S

Mariness, David. First in His Class: A Biography of Bill Clinton. (NY: Simon & Schuster, 1995.) One of the better biographies of Clinton. S

Martin, Gene L and Aaron Boyd. Bill Clinton: President From Arkansas. (Greensboro, NC: Tudor Publishing Company, 1993.) A good elementary-level biography of the President. P

McMath, Anne. First Ladies of Arkansas: Women of Their Times. (Little Rock: August House, 1989) Brief biographies of the Arkansas governors wives up to Hillary Clinton, including the territorial first ladies. McMath, herself, was a first lady. M,S

Nunn, Walter, compiler. Readings in Arkansas Government. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1973.) S

Old State House Museum. Legislative Process Program. Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for more information on this in-class program that takes students through the bill-making process. Guest Speaker.

_____. Old State House News. (Back issues include, People of Arkansas, Fall 1988; Transportation in Arkansas, Spring 1989; Black Experience in Arkansas, Fall 1989; Arkansans at War, Fall 1990; Disasters in Arkansas, Fall 1991; Where We Lived, Spring 1995; School Days in Arkansas, Fall 1996; and Arkansans Make Music, Fall 1995.) Write 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685 for a complimentary copy.

Roberts, Jack. Our Forty-Second President: Bill Clinton. (NY: Scholastic, 1993.) P,M

Rosenberg, Joseph. Dillards: The First Fifty Years. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1988.) A history of the department store. M,S

Schwartz, Marvin. J.B. Hunt: The Long Haul of Success. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1992.) Hunt is known as the transportation king of Arkansas. S

_____. Tyson: From Farm to Market. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1991.) History of the poultry industry in the state. S

Simpson, Ethel C., compiler and editor. Arkansas in Short Fiction: Stories From 1841-1984. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.) Good selection of fiction from the antebellum period to the present. M,S

Trimble, Vance. Sam Walton: The Inside Story of Americas Richest Man. (NY: Dutton, 1990.)

Walton, Sam. Sam Walton: Made in America. (NY: Doubleday, 1992.) Wal-Mart hit its peak in the early 1990s. S

Modern Arkansas - Media

Arkansas Video Almanac. (Little Rock: Jones Productions, 1993.) 60 minute video. Includes trivia and historical facts. P,M,S

Arkansas: Its Architectural Heritage, 1918-Present. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1981-1984. ) 45 minute video or filmstrip. Program traces the legacy of building from World War II topresent. M,S

Department of Arkansas Heritage. Web site. www.heritage.state.ar.us

From Jennies to Jets and Beyond. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 15 minute video. This program follows the aviation time line from aviation oddities to NASAs space shuttle, the Enterprise. Arkansas aviation pioneers are featured. M,S

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) Exhibit. Features photographs and documents that interpret the struggle and development of Arkansas blacks. M,S

Persistence of the Spirit: The Black Experience in Arkansas. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1986.) 32 minute video. The life and accomplishments of black Arkansans from territorial days to the present are examined. Study guide available. M,S

Modern Arkansas - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Forestry Commission. Educational materials and programs are available by contacting 3821 West Roosevelt, Little Rock, AR 72204-6396 or call (501) 664-2531. Protects and develops forest resources for the state.

Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, 10324 Interstate 30, P.O. Box 2261, Little Rock, AR 72203, or call (501) 569-2000. Call for class-size set of AHTD highway maps and other information.

Arkansas State Parks and Tourism, One Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 682-7777. Request school kit.

Buffalo National River, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1173, Harrison, AR 72602 or call (501) 741-5443. Park interpreters provide programs upon request during the school year and on a regular schedule during summer months on the natural and cultural history of the river.

Delta Cultural Center, P.O. Box 509, Helena, AR 72342, or call (870) 338-4350. Museum located in reconstructed historic 1913 railway depot. Exhibits provide details on the history and life of eastern Arkansas, from prehistoric times to the present with emphasis on the role played by African-Americans. Tours available upon request, admission free.

Hope Visitor Center and Museum, P.O. Box 596, Hope, AR 71802, or call (870) 722-2580. Exhibits focusing on the birth and early childhood years of President Bill Clinton in Hope, Arkansas. AV materials and tours of presidential sites available.

Hot Springs National Park, National Park Service, P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs, AR 71902, or call (501) 624-3383.

Museum of Discovery, Arkansas Museum of Science and History*, 500 East Markham, Suite 150, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 396-7050. Provides extensive on-site and outreach programming and loan materials focusing on Arkansas from prehistoric through modern times. Arkansas Indian exhibit traces Arkansas native inhabitants from contemporary descendants to our prehistoric ancestors. Also, exhibits on Arkansas forests.

Old State House Museum, 300 West Markham, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9685. Arkansass state capitol building from 1836 to 1911 and the oldest surviving Greek Revival state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Exhibits on Arkansas history. Free admission, tours available. Bill Clinton exhibit.

Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, 118 West Johnson, Springdale, AR 72764, or call (501 750-8165. Exhibits focus on the history of northwest Arkansas.

 

 

XI. General Materials

General Materials - Printed Materials

Arkansas Historical Quarterly. (Fayetteville: Arkansas Historical Association, 1941-) This journal should be in every high school library. S

Arkansas Statistical Abstract. (Little Rock: UALR Business Center, 1986-.) A great resource for statistical information of all kinds. S

Baker, T. Harri and Jane Browning. An Arkansas History for Young People. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.) Includes Teachers Guide. P,M,S

Berry Fred T. and John Novak. The History of Arkansas. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1987.) M,S

Couch, Ruth. This Land of Legend. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1987.) P,M

Gill, John Purifoy and Marjem Jackson Gill. On the Courthouse Square in Arkansas. (Little Rock?: The Authors, 1980.) Photographs and brief descriptions of the county courthouses of Arkansas. Especially useful for photographs. P,M,S

Dillard, Tom W. and Valerie Thwing. Researching Arkansas History. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1981.) A basic introduction to the resources then available. M,S

Dougan, Michael B. Arkansas Odyssey: The Saga of Arkansas From Prehistoric Times to Present. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Company, 1994.) S The definitive secondary-level general history of the state. S

_____, Tom W. Dillard, and Timothy G. Nutt, compilers. Arkansas History: An Annotated Bibliography. (Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995.) M,S

Fletcher, John Gould. Arkansas. (Reprint: Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1989.) An impressionistic view by the Pulitzer Prize winning poet. M,S

Gerlach, Russell L. And William Wedenoja. The Heritage of the Ozarks. (Little Rock: August House, 1984.) Multicultural curriculum. M,S

Historical Report of the Secretary of State. (Little Rock: Secretary of State, 1986) This reference, irregularly published, lists state and county officials. M,S

James, Douglas A. Joseph C. Neal. Arkansas Birds: Their Distribution and Abundance. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.)

Lancaster, Bob. "Virtually Tick-Free." Arkansas Times: A History of Arkansas in Stories and Pictures. (Little Rock: Arkansas Writers Project, 1994.) The states image of itself has been mostly negative. M,S

McDonough, Nancy. Garden Sass: A Catalog of Arkansas Folkways. (NY: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1975.) S

Paulson, Al. Roadside History of Arkansas. (Missoula, MT: Mountain Press, 1998.) In the same vein as the WPA Guide to Arkansas. P,M,S

Sealander, John A and Gary A. Heidt. Arkansas Mammals: Their Natural History, Classification and Distribution. (Fayetteville: University of Akansas Press, 1990.) Comprehensive guide to the states mammal population.

Smith, Richard. The Atlas of Arkansas. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1989.) Statistical information on demographics and climate. M,S

Sutherlin, Diann. The Arkansas Handbook. (Little Rock: Fly-by-Night Press, 1996.) Lots of trivia about the state. P,M,S

Thompson, Kathleen. Arkansas. (Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughan, 1996.) Describes the beauty, splendor and features of the state. P,M

Works Projects Administration. The WPA Guide to 1930s Arkansas. (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1987) M,S This reprint of the 1941 reference work provides a good introduction to Arkansas history, as well as a good travel guide to the state.

General Materials - Media

Amazon Books. Web site. www.amazon.com

The American Civil War. Web site. www.access.digex.net/~bdboyle/cw.html

Arkansas. Web site. www.state.ar.us

Arkansas Archeological Survey. Web site. www.uark.edu/campus-resources/archinfo/

Arkansas Business Online. Web site. www.abnews.com

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Web site. www.ardemgaz.com

Arkansas Department of Education. Web site. arkedu.state.ar.us

Arkansas Education Television Network. www.aetn.org

Arkansas General Assembly. Web site. www.arkleg.state.ar.us

Arkansas 150 Minutes. (Conway: AETN, )This program is a series of one-minute spots on the Sesquicentennial celebration in Arkansas.

Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department. Web site. www.ahtd.state.ar.us

Arkansas State Library. Web site. www.asl.lib.ar.us

Arkansas Times Online. Web site. www.arktimes.com

Central Arkansas Library System. Web site. www.cals.lib.ar.us. Downloadable lesson plans.

His Arkansas Land. (Little Rock: Arkansas Humanities Council, 1985.) 60 minute video or filmstrip. Development of Arkansas through the people whose livelihood depends on the land. M,S

History Channel. Web site. www.historychannel.com

Kelsey, Steve. "Home in Arkansas." (Eureka Springs: Out of the Woods, 1993.) An audio cassette includes the different state songs as well as historic songs. P,M,S

Library of Congress. Web site. www.loc.gov

MacMillan Publishers. Web site. www.mmhschool.com/teach/socialstud/states/ss-wla4.html#socsuar. Downloadable lesson plans.

National Archives. www.nara.gov

National History Day. Web site. thehistorynet.com/NationalHistoryDay/

The History Net. thehistorynet.com

National Park Service. Web site. www.nps.gov

Persistence of the Spirit. Web site. www.aristotle.net/persistence

U.S. Census Bureau. Web site. www.census.gov

University of Arkansas. www.uark.edu. For indices, www.uark.edu/ind.html

University of Arkansas Press. Web site. www.uark.edu/campus-resources/uaprinfo/public_html

Yahoo history search. Web site. www.yahoo.com/arts/humanities/history/indice. In the search field, enter "Arkansas."

General Materials - Field Studies and Additional Resources

Arkansas Heritage Month, sponsored by the Department of Arkansas Heritage each May. Write 1500 Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, or call (501) 324-9150 for more information on this celebration of Arkansas history and culture.

Arkansas History Commission, One Capitol Mall, 2B-215, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501) 682-6900. State archives

Arkansas State Capitol. Contact the Secretary of State for tours and educational packages.

Museums. Many counties have both local historical societies and museums that offer programs and resources specific to their locales.



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