The Food Safety Consortium
2010 Personnel Directory

  • University of Arkansas
  • Iowa State University
  • Kansas State University
  • STEERING COMMITTEE

    The Consortium Steering Committee is responsible for overseeing the food safety program of the three-state Consortium to ensure that it is progressing in a satisfactory manner toward meeting its purpose as outlined in the congressional mandate. The committee meets at least once each year to review research progress and to recommend, if necessary, changes that may be required to accomplish the congressional mandate.

    Mark J. Cochran
    Committee Chair
    Associate Vice President
    for Agriculture-Research
    E-108 AFLS Building
    University of Arkansas
    Fayetteville, AR 72701
    479-575-8703
    Fax 479-575-6363
    mcochran@uark.edu

    Fred Cholick
    Dean/Director
    College of Agriculture/Agricultural Experiment Station
    114 Waters Hall
    Kansas State University
    Manhattan, KS 66506
    785-532-7137
    Fax 785-532-6563
    fcholick@ksu.edu

    James Denton
    Center of Excellence for Poultry Science
    University of Arkansas
    Fayetteville, AR 72701
    479-575-4952
    Fax 479-575-3026
    jdenton@uark.edu

    Rich Degner
    Executive Director
    Iowa Pork Producers Association
    1636 N.W. 114th St.
    Clive, IA 50053
    515-225-7675
    Fax 515-225-0563
    rdegner@iowapork.org

    Lynda Kelley
    USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Russell Research Center
    950 College Station Road
    Athens, GA 30604
    706-546-3314
    Lynda.Kelley@fsis.usda.gov

    Ed Moix
    Senior Director, Quality Assurance
    National Accounts Division
    Tyson Foods, Inc.
    2210 W. Oaklawn Drive
    Springdale, AR 72762-6999
    479-290-4674
    Fax 479-290-7973
    Cell 479-381-0486
    ed.moix@tyson.com

    Donald L. Reynolds
    Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies
    College of Veterinary Medicine
    2252 Veterinary Medicne
    Iowa State University
    Ames, IA 50011
    515-294-0914
    Fax 515-294-8341
    dlr@iastate.edu

    Irene Wesley
    National Animal Disease Center
    P.O. Box 70
    Ames, IA 50010
    515-239-8291
    Fax 515-239-8458
    iwesley@nadc.ars.usda.gov

    Craig Wilson
    Director of Food Safety and Technology
    Costco Wholesale
    P.O. Box 34331
    Issaquah, WA 98027
    425-313-8100
    Fax 425-313-8591
    cwilson@costco.com

    TECHNICAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

    Mark J. Cochran
    Committee Chair
    Associate Vice President
    for Agriculture-Research
    E-108 AFLS Building
    University of Arkansas
    Fayetteville, AR 72701
    479-575-8703
    Fax 479-575-7273
    mcochran@uark.edu

    James S. Dickson
    Professor, Department of Animal Science
    215F Meats Laboratory
    Iowa State University
    Ames, IA 50011
    515-294-4733
    Fax 515-294-6019
    jdickson@iastate.edu

    Curtis Kastner
    Director, Food Science Institute
    216 Call Hall
    Kansas State University
    Manhattan, KS 66506
    785-532-1234
    Fax 785-532-5861
    ckastner@ksu.edu

    Steven C. Ricke
    Director, Center for Food Safety
    E-27 Food Science
    University of Arkansas
    Fayetteville, AR 72701
    479-575-4678
    Fax 479-575-6936
    sricke@uark.edu

    PUBLIC INFORMATION

    Dave Edmark
    Communications Director
    Food Safety Consortium
    110 Agriculture Building
    University of Arkansas
    Fayetteville, AR 72701
    479-575-5647
    Fax: 479-575-7531
    dedmark@uark.edu

    Brian Meyer
    Agri Information Services
    304 Curtiss Hall
    Iowa State University
    Ames, IA 50011
    515-294-0706
    Fax: 515-294-8662
    bmeyer@iastate.edu

    Beth Ann Crozier-Dodson
    Department of Animal Sciences and Industry
    202 Call Hall
    Kansas State University
    Manhattan, KS 66506
    785-532-1298
    Fax 785-532-5681
    bethann@ksu.edu




    UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
    Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

    Principal Investigators

    Philip G. Crandall (B.S., horticulture; M.S. and Ph.D., food science, Purdue University), professor, Department of Food Science. Dr. Crandall's research areas include both thermal and non-thermal food processing, natural antimicrobials, benefit/risk assessment and nutraceuticals. Within the Consortium he is a principal investigator for the University of Arkansas' research on irradiation of poultry products and safety of ready-to-eat foods. He is also cooperating on other Consortium projects on food processing. N-213 Food Science, 479-575-7686; Fax 479-575-6935; crandal@uark.edu.

    Dan J. Donoghue (B.S., M.S., animal science; Ph.D., poultry science, Texas A&M University), associate professor, Department of Poultry Science. Dr. Donoghue's research interests include examining commensal and foodborne pathogen interactions during production. He is also interested in developing predictive pharmacokinetic models of antibiotic and pesticide transfer in poultry. With the Consortium, he is a member of a team evaluating pre-harvest intervention strategies to reduce or prevent the incidence of foodborne pathogens in poultry. O-408 Poultry Science; 479-575-2913; Fax 479-575-7139; ddonogh@uark.edu.

    Billy M. Hargis (B.S., animal science, University of Minnesota; M.S., poultry science, University of Georgia; D.V.M. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Diplomate, American College of Poultry Veterinarians), professor and director, Poultry Health Research Laboratory, chair of the Endowed Tyson Chair for Sustainable Poultry Health within the Department of Poultry Science. Dr. Hargis' current research is focused on alternatives to antibiotics for poultry disease treatment and prevention. Current research includes development of rapid methodologies for specific bacteriophage selection and amplification for killing infectious foodborne pathogens and the development of improved competitive exclusion cultures for prevention of antemortem infection with foodborne pathogens. Center of Excellence for Poultry Science; 479-575-4390; Fax 479-575-8490; bhargis@uark.edu.

    Navam Hettiarachchy (B.S., chemistry, Madras University, India; M.S. biochemistry [specialized in medical enzymology] University of Edinburgh Medical School, Scotland; Ph.D., biochemistry, University of Hull, England), professor, Department of Food Science. Dr. Hettiarachchy's current research efforts focus on food protein structure-functional relationship; functional foods/ingredients and nutraceuticals; phytochemicals; edible and biodegradable films and coatings; pro-and pre-biotics and natural antioxidants. As specifically related to the Food Safety Consortium, the focus is on: (1) evaluating hydrophilic and hydrophobic edible film packaging as vehicles and substrates for selected plant extracts and isoflavones to inhibit growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium) in heat processed poultry meat and (2) maintenance of raw product quality of marinated poultry breasts with antioxidants during and after electron beam irradiation. N-218 Food Science; 479-575-4779; Fax 479-575-6936; nhettiar@uark.edu.

    Geraldine R. Huff (B.S., food and nutrition, M.A., microbiology, and Ph.D., animal science, University of Arkansas), microbiologist, USDA/ARS/Poultry Production and Product Safety Research Unit, and research assistant professor, Department of Poultry Science. Dr. Huff's research program involves the investigation of the effects of stress on the immune system of turkeys and development of appropriate interventions to decrease pathogen load and susceptibility to disease in stressed turkeys; determination of the genetic and environmental components that influence the turkey stress response and its effects on host immunity and pathogen virulence; study of bacterial ecology, the host/pathogen interaction during stress and chronic disease, particularly turkey osteomyelitis complex, and determination of the effects that bacteria contained in the carcasses of chronically diseased animals may have on food safety. O-306 Poultry Science; 479-575-7966; Fax 479-575-4202; grhuff@uark.edu.

    William E. Huff (B.S., microbiology, University of Central Florida; M.S. and Ph.D., Microbiology, North Carolina State University), research microbiologist, USDA/ARS/Poultry Production and Product Safety Research Unit and research professor, Department of Poultry Science. Dr. Huff's current research interests include evaluation of the use of bacteriophage to prevent and treat poultry disease, as well as the use of bacteriophage to reduce the contamination of poultry products with foodborne pathogens. O-306 Poultry Science; 479-575-2104; Fax 479-575-4202; huff@uark.edu.

    Michael G. Johnson (B.S., microbiology; M.S., food science, University of Illinois, Urbana; Ph.D., microbiology, University of California, Davis), professor, Department of Food Science, Center for Food Safety-IFSE, Div. of Agriculture. Dr. Johnson's areas of research include food microbiology, safety of raw and cooked ready-to-eat foods. With the Consortium he is principal investigator for research on monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and nucleic acid probes specific for pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter. Besides rapid, specific methods, he is exploring use of in vitro cell assays with hybridoma cells and other cultured cells to assess the infective doses and virulence of pathogenic bacterial isolates from foods, and the use of bacteriocins and bacteriocin delivery systems and thermal processing strategies sufficient to kill vegetative cells and arrest outgrowth of spores of pathogenic bacteria in foods and pathogen antibiotic and starvation resistances. N-215 Food Science; 479-575-4778; Cell 479-466-9961; Fax 479-575-3941; mjohnson@uark.edu.

    Young Min Kwon (B.S. and M.S., Seoul National University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University), associate professor, Department of Poultry Science, Dr. Kwon's main research area is pathogenic mechanisms of foodborne bacterial pathogens of animal origin. His laboratory is using genetic and genomic approaches to study the mechanisms used by Salmonella enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni to colonize and persist in poultry. Currently, his research is focused on characterizing genetic and environmental determinants regulating the colonization and virulence of the pathogens and development of effective control measures. O-213 Poultry Science; 479-575-4935; Fax 479-575-8775; ykwon@uark.edu.

    Yanbin Li (B.S., Shenyang Agricultural University; M.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University), professor, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, the Center of Excellence for Poultry Science. Dr. Li's major research areas are biosensors and biosafety engineering. With the Consortium his research involves the development of immuno-electrochemical, immuno-optical, chemiluminescent and impedance biosensors for rapid detection of pathogens in food products, and predictive models and quantitative risk assessment simulation for Salmonella, Listeria and Campylobacter in poultry products. He is also researching the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria on poultry products and in processing water using electrochemical, surfactant spray and thermal methods. O-411 Poultry Science; 479-575-2424; Fax 479-575-7139; yanbinli@uark.edu.

    John Marcy (B.S., Food Technology and Science, University of Tennessee; M.S., Ph.D., Food Technology, Iowa State University), Professor, Center of Excellence for Poultry Science. His research interests are poultry processing, meat microbiology, and food safety. He does educational programming of Culinary Arts for Product Developers as well as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), sanitation, and microbiology for processing personnel. He has conducted HACCP workshops for meat and poultry processors in several U.S. locations as well as Argentina, New Zealand and Costa Rica. He has participated twice in U.S. Senate committee hearings on food safety and inspection. In 2002, Dr. Marcy served on the National Academy of Science committee on review of the use of scientific criteria and performance standards for safe food. O-203 Poultry Science; 479-575-2211; Fax 479-575-8775; jmarcy@uark.edu.

    Corliss O'Bryan (B.S., biology, Bradley University; M.A., botany-microbiology, Ph.D., Medicine-Microbiology, University of Missouri-Columbia), post-doctoral associate, Department of Food Science. She is working with Dr. Crandall on food safety in the areas of natural antimicrobials, poultry and red meats, and on risk assessment in the area of fresh fruits and vegetables. B5 Food Science; 479-575-2781; Fax 479-575-6936; cobryan@uark.edu.

    Steven C. Ricke (B.S., animal science, University of Illinois; M.S. ruminant nutrition, University of Illinois; Ph.D., animal science and bacteriology, University of Wisconsin), Donald “Buddy” Wray Endowed Professor and Director of the Center for Food Safety with a joint appointment in the Departments of Food Science and Poultry Science. Dr. Ricke is also technical director of the Arkansas component of the FSC. Dr. Ricke's food safety research program is primarily focused on Salmonella spp. ecology and control in food production with an emphasis on determining environmental factors that influence prevalence of Salmonella spp. in poultry pre- and post-harvest production settings. His research currently involves how gastrointestinal growth conditions influence virulence and pathogenic characteristics of salmonellae in chickens and other animal species. With the consortium he is working on developing genetic tools to optimize multiple hurdle antimicrobial technologies for control of foodborne pathogens in processing. E-27 Food Science; 479-575-4678; Fax 479-575-6936; sricke@uark.edu; Web site: www.foodscience.uark.edu/ricke.html

    M. F. Slavik (B.A., biology, Drake University; M.S., bacteriology, Ph.D., veterinary microbiology, Iowa State University), professor, Department of Poultry Science. Dr. Slavik's main area of research is food safety. With the Consortium he is developing rapid methods to detect bacterial contaminants of chicken carcasses, including genetic probes, fluorescent immunoassays, image processing and biosensors. He is also developing methods to reduce or eliminate microbial contamination of chicken carcasses. Additional research includes pathogenicity studies of Campylobacter jejuni. O-310 Poultry Science; 479-575-4387; Fax 479-575-4202; mslavik@uark.edu.

    Research and Technical Support

    Dana G. Bassi (B.S., horticulture, and M.S., entomology, University of Arkansas), biological science technician, USDA/ARS/Poultry Production and Product Safety Research Unit. Dana manages the microbiology lab for the USDA/ARS/PPPSR Unit and works with Dr. Geraldine Huff, conducting research on turkey osteomyelitis complex and effects of stress and disease on food safety of poultry. O-303 Poultry Science Center; 479-575-3939; Fax 479-575-4202; dbassi@uark.edu.

    Lisa Cooney (B.A., microbiology, University of Arkansas), program associate, Department of Poultry Science. She is involved in research on predictive models of Listeria in poultry thermal processing and nanofiber coating for inactivation of foodborne pathogens. O-414 Poultry Science; 479-575-6684; Fax 479-575-7139; lcooney@uark.edu.

    David S. Edmark (B.J., University of Missouri; M.A., University of Arkansas), communications director. He is the editor of Consortium publications and handles media relations. 110 Agriculture Building; 479-575-5647; Fax 479-575-7531; dedmark@uark.edu.

    Irene Hanning (B.S., marine biology, Texas A&M University, Ph.D., cell and molecular biology, University of Arkansas). Her research involves determining the ability of foodborne pathogens to form biofilms. She also studies the molecular basis for virulence mechanisms and toxin production by foodborne pathogens. C-2 Food Science; 479-575-4206; ihanning@uark.edu.

    Kentu Lassiter (B.S., biology, M.S., poultry science, University of Arkansas), program associate, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. His research involves impedance biosensors for detection of foodborne pathogens in poultry. O-420 Poultry Science; 479-575-7129; Fax 479-575-7139; klassit@uark.edu.

    Robert Story (B.S., zoology; M.S., microbiology, University of Arkansas), program associate, Department of Food Science, Center for Food Safety-IFSE, Division of Agriculture. He is working on the development of monoclonal antibodies and in vitro virulence assays through the use of various tissue culture cell lines for the pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni. 128 Biomass Research Center, 479-575-5008; Fax 479-575-3941; rstory@uark.edu.

    Hong Wang (B.S., China Medical University, Shenyang; M.S., Food Science, University of Arkansas), research associate, Department of Poultry Science. She is working on developing methods to eliminate Salmonella and other bacteria from chicken carcasses and developing rapid methods to detect these bacteria. O-320 Poultry Science; 479-575-7557; Fax 479-575-7294.

    Ronghui Wang (B.A., M.S., molecular biology; Ph.D., analytical chemistry, Hunan University), research associate, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. She is working with research on DNA biosensors for rapid detection of bacteria and viruses. O-414 Poultry Science; 479-575-6684; Fax 479-575-7139; rhw@uark.edu.

    Keith Wiggins (B.S., food science, University of Arkansas), program technician, Department of Food Science. He is working with Dr. Nannapaneni on development of monoclonal antibodies for pathogens, in vitro pathogenicity hybridoma cell assays, pathogen antibiotic and starvation resistances and bacteriocins. 120 Biomass Research Center; 479-575-2637; Fax 479-575-3941; kcwiggi@uark.edu.

    Amanda Wolfenden (B.S., University of Arkansas), research specialist and M.S. student, Poultry Health Research Laboratory, Department of Poultry Science. Ms. Wolfenden is developing improved defined and undefined competitive exclusion cultures for prevention of Salmonella and Campylobacter infections in growing poultry and working with selected organic acid mixtures and effects on Salmonella in the upper GIT. She is also heavily involved in the development of rapid methodologies for selection and amplification of specific bacteriophage for effective treatment of foodborne pathogen infections in growing poultry. Center of Excellence for Poultry Science; 479-575-5359; Fax 479-575-8490; addrake@uark.edu.

    Scott Zornes (B.S., animal science, University of Arkansas), biological research technician, USDA/ARS/Poultry Production and Product Safety Research Unit. Zornes provides technical assistance in the bacteriophage work conduct by the Research Unit, provides oversight and management of the poultry farm, and provides the Research Unit with computer support.

    Graduate Students
    Cell and Molecular Biology Program

    Damira Kanayeva (B.S., ecology, M.S., biotechnology, Kazakh National University). Her research involves nanowire based impedance biosensor for detection of Listeria in foods. O-419 Poultry Science; 479-575-7627; Fax 479-575-7139; dkanayev@uark.edu.

    Anita Khatiwara (B.S., veterinary science and animal husbandry, Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University). Her research involves physiological and genetic characterization of important foodborne pathogens, Salmonella enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni. O-219 Poultry Science; 479-575-6404; akhatiw@uark.edu.

    Graduate Students
    Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering

    Yun Wang (B.S., biological engineering, Beijing Engineering University). Her research involves impedance biosensor for detection of bacteria and virus. O-419 Poultry Science; 479-575-7627; Fax 479-575-7139; yun@uark.edu.

    Graduate Students
    Department of Food Science

    Min Li (B.S., M.S., food science, China Agricultural University). Her research involves microbial prediction modeling and risk assessment simulation for pathogenic bacteria in poultry. O-419 Poultry Science; 479-575-7627; Fax 479-575-7139; minli@uark.edu.

    Bwalya Lungu (B.S., microbiology, University of Botswana; M.S., food science, University of Arkansas). Her work involves control of pathogens using edible films with bacteriocins and foodgrade chemicals and behavior of L. monocytogenes when starved and challenged with these chemicals. Biomass Research Center, 479-575-6864; Fax 479-575-3941; blungu@uark.edu.

    Joshua Saldivar (B.S., chemistry/biochemistry, University of Arkansas). His work will center on elaboration of toxins by bacterial pathogens as a function of starvation. Biomass Research Center, 479-575-6864; Fax 479-575-3941; jsaldiv@uark.edu.

    Graduate Students
    Department of Poultry Science

    Jeong Nam Kim (B.S., M.S., Kyung Hee University, Korea). His research focuses on the persistence of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry drinking water. L-115 Poultry Science; 479-575-6404; Fax 479-575-8775; jxk11@uark.edu.

    Zhaohui Yang (M.S., microbiology, Wuhan University). Her research focuses on the reduction of bacteria on poultry. O-114 Poultry Science; 479-575-6404; Fax 479-575-8775.

    UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FOR MEDICAL SCIENCES
    Little Rock, Arkansas 72205

    Principal Investigators

    Philip Breen (B.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy), associate professor, Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy. Dr. Breen adds his expertise in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism to the research of the Chemical Studies Related to Food Safety sub-project. 501-686-5092; Fax 501-686-8315; breenphilipj@uams.edu.

    Kathleen D. Eisenach (Ph.D., microbiology and immunology, University of Arkansas), professor, Department of Pathology and Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Her major research interests include the development of molecular assays for detecting infectious diseases and molecular methods for strain typing. With the Consortium she is working on methods for genotyping Salmonella and Campylobacter. Medical Research 151/LR, CAVHS, 4300 W. Seventh St., Little Rock, Ark. 72205; 501-257-4827; Fax 501-664-6748; eisenachkathleend@uams.edu.

    Co-Investigators

    Cesar M. Compadre (B.S., M.S., National University of Mexico; Ph.D., University of Illinois), associate professor, Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy. His major research areas are medicinal chemistry, molecular modeling and investigations of chemical and microbial agents in poultry. His work with the Consortium involves computational medicinal chemistry and computer-aided molecular modeling. 501-686-6493; Fax 501-686-6057; compadrecesarm@uams.edu.

    Ricki M. Helm (B.A., Wartburg College; M.A., Drake University; Ph.D., University of Manitoba), associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology/Allergy. Dr. Helm's major research is in food allergen characterization. His role in the Consortium is to culture and identify Campylobacter from in-home food sources. Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, 1120 Marshall St., Little Rock, Ark. 72202-3591; 501-320-1060; Fax 501-320-3173; HelmRicki@uams.edu.

    Research and Technical Support

    Maria Mercado (B.S., biology, InterAmerican University of Puerto Rico), research assistant, Pathology Department. Her research involves developing a repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) to distinguish strains of Campylobacter jejuni. Also, she is investigating the discriminatory power of rep-PCR by comparing results with pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis using Bionumerics software. 151/LR, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, 4300 W. Seventh St., Little Rock, Ark. 72205; 501-257-1000, extension 54866; MMercado@uams.edu.



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    IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
    Ames, Iowa 50011

    Principal Investigators

    Dong Uk Ahn (B.S., M.S., animal science, Seoul National University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, poultry science and meat and animal science), professor, Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University. His research interests are the application of basic meat science to poultry processing to solve industry problems including mechanisms and prevention of lipid oxidation in meat, mechanisms and control of off-odor production and color changes in irradiated raw and cooked meat, biological effects of cholesterol, cholesterol oxides, and conjugated linoleic acid, and separation and utilization of value-added egg components. 2276 Kildee; 515-294-6595; Fax 515-294-9143; duahn@iastate.edu.

    Byron Brehm-Stecher (Ph.D., food science, University of Wisconsin-Madison), assistant professor, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Research interests focus on food safety and biosecurity. Rapid molecular detection of foodborne pathogens and food spoilage organisms; flow cytometry and other single-cell analytical methods; biomimetics; multi-component antimicrobial systems for use in foods, on food contact surfaces or in environmental applications. 2581 Food Science; 515-294-6469; Fax 515-294-8181; byron@iastate.edu.

    Nancy A. Cornick (B.S., University of Colorado; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University), assistant professor, Department of Veterinary Microbiology. Dr. Cornick's research focuses on pre-harvest food safety, bacterial colonization mechanisms, transmission of zoonotic bacteria, pathogenesis of enteric E. coli diseases, and microbial ecology of gastrointestinal systems. 2130 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-6499; Fax 515-294-8500; ncornick@iastate.edu.

    Radford Davis (D.V.M., Colorado State University; M.P.H., University of Arizona), assistant professor of Public Health Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Research focuses on public health emergency response, bioterrorism education, preparedness, response; agricultural bioterrorism; zoonotic disease awareness and education; public health of Eskimos of northern Alaska (brucellosis, toxoplasmosis, rabies, dog bites, etc.); societal determinants of emerging infectious diseases; dog bite prevention and awareness; HIV and the risks associated with animal contact; rabies; public health education. Dr. Davis is a zoonotic consultant for the Iowa Department of Public Health. 2132 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-8972; Fax 515-294-8500; rgdavis@iastate.edu; http://www.vetmed.iastate.edu/faculty_staff/Users/rdavis/publichealth/Home.html

    James S. Dickson (B.S., Clemson University; M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Nebraska), professor, Department of Animal Science; chair, Food Safety Consortium. Dr. Dickson's research focuses on the control of bacteria of public health significance in foods of animal origin. He is interested in intervention strategies, including irradiation, which may be effective in controlling these bacteria. 215F Meats Laboratory; 515-294-4733; Fax 515-294-6019; jdickson@iastate.edu.

    Stephen B. Gaul (B.S., Iowa State University, M.S., University of Arizona), assistant scientist, Department of Microbiology. Laboratory manager and researcher for Dr. Hank Harris. Research focus is on multi-drug resistant isolates of Salmonella and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. 11A Kildee; 515-294-6395; Fax 515-294-5294; sbgaul@iastate.edu.

    Ron Griffith (D.V.M., Michigan State University; M.S., veterinary microbiology, Iowa State University; Ph.D., veterinary microbiology, Iowa State University), associate professor, Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Griffith studies food safety, including infection and contamination of pork and turkey meat with Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria, and E. coli species. His research interests also include Bovine Respiratory Disease and the immediate hypersensitivity associated with infection and vaccination against Haemophilus somnus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus. Dr. Griffith is the North Central Regional Coordinator for the National Research Support Project (NSRP-7, Minor Species Drug Program) for the USDA. 2164 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-0902; Fax 515-294-8500; rgriffit@iastate.edu.

    Karen Harmon (B.S., food science, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., food science, University of Minnesota), research microbiologist, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories. Her primary research focus is on rapid detection methods of foodborne pathogens. 1638 VDL; 515-294-5184; Fax 515-239-3564; kharmon@iastate.edu.

    D. L. (Hank) Harris (D.V.M. and Ph.D., Iowa State University), professor, Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Harris's research interests concern disease preventive measures for swine production and human pork consumption. His laboratory is certified by the Danish Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen to conduct the Danish Mix-ELISA serological test for detecting the level of Salmonella shedding in swine. The long-term objective is to develop a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system for swine production farms, which decreases both human foodborne diseases and economically significant swine diseases. 11 Kildee; 515-294-1664; Fax 515-294-5294; hharris@iastate.edu.

    H. Scott Hurd (B.S., Virginia Tech University; D.V.M., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University), associate professor, Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Hurd's current research activities involve understanding the epidemiology and ecology of foodborne pathogens in swine and their environment. His goal is to identify preharvest farm-level management factors that will reduce the prevalence of pathogens in market pigs. His other interests include systems and risk assessment modeling. He worked in developing the National Animal Health Monitoring System, and on risk assessments for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), tuberculosis in white-tailed deer, avian influenza, and Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs.

    Helen H. Jensen (B.S., economics, Carleton College; M.S., agricultural and applied economics, University of Minnesota; Ph.D., agricultural economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison), professor of economics, head of the Food Safety Research Consortium, and head of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development at Iowa State University. Current research focuses on food programs and policies, including food safety. Major research areas are food demand analysis, food assistance and nutrition policies, issues related to food security, and the economics of food safety and food hazard control options. Her research with the Consortium is in integrated risk and cost-based analysis of Salmonella in the pork production chain. This research will address the question of how changes at various points in the pork production process affect the predicted number of human salmonellosis cases attributable to port and the costs of alternative control interventions. 578E Heady Hall; 515-294-6253; hhjensen@ iastate.edu; http://www.econ.iastate.edu/people/faculty/facWebPage.asp?page=gen&fac=23

    James D. McKean (D.V.M., University of Illinois; M.S., veterinary pathology, Michigan State University; J.D., Drake University), extension veterinarian. His major research includes residue prevention, quality assurance and pseudo rabies control. With the Consortium his research involves sulfamethazine depletion in market-weight swine to determine the likelihood of "clean" pigs being contaminated by exposure to improperly withdrawn swine; medical and feed management for sulfamethazine; and comparing sulfamethazine depletion with sulfamethazine activity from previous experiments. 2270B Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-8792; x2mckean@exnet.iastate.edu.

    Aubrey F. Mendonca (B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., Iowa State University), associate professor, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Dr. Mendonca's research focuses on control and detection of foodborne pathogens. His areas of research include: thermal inactivation of foodborne pathogens, stress-adaptation and its effect on microbial resistance to food processing technologies, and development of novel methods for detection of injured foodborne pathogens. 2312 Food Sciences; 515-294-2950; Fax 515-294-8181; amendon@iastate.edu.

    Annette O'Connor (D.V.S., University of Guelph; M.V.S., University of Queensland; B.V.S., University of Sydney) assistant professor, bovine production and epidemiology, Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine. Dr. O'Connor's scientific interests and experience are in the application of quantitative epidemiology to infectious diseases and food safety. In infectious disease, Dr. O'Connor has worked primarily with respiratory diseases of cattle. She currently has research projects examining the association between BVDV serology and UBRD occurrence, the effect of Neospora exposure on feed lot performance, test characteristics of Johne's disease tests in beef cattle and the genetics' of resistance/susceptibility of pink eye in beef cattle. She also has a strong research interest in food safety and her work has concentrated of the ecology of Salmonella in pork in the pre-harvest environment and antimicrobial resistance. 1712 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-8791; oconnor@iastate.edu.

    Gregory J. Phillips (B.A. and M.A., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Georgia), associate professor, Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Phillips' major research interest focuses on detection and analysis of pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. 202 VMRI; 515-294-1525; Fax 515-294-6019; gregory@iastate.edu.

    Kenneth Platt (B.S., pre-veterinary medicine, Pennsylvania State University; D.V.M., veterinary medicine, Cornell University; M.S., Hemoparasites, Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Virology, Iowa State University), professor, Department of Veterinary Microbiology. His primary research focus is on viral diseases of swine. His secondary area of focus is the biology of arthropod transmitted disease agents of public health significance. 2154 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-4940; Fax 515-294-8500; kbplatt@iastate.edu.

    Joseph G. Sebranek (B.S., Animal Science, University of Wisconsin-Platteville; M.S., Ph.D., meat and animal science, food science, University of Wisconsin-Madison), professor, Department of Animal Science, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. His research efforts are directed at meat processing technology and ingredient uses that impact food safety and human health. With the Consortium, he has been studying the effectiveness of organic acid treatments for the decontamination of pork carcasses prior to chilling. The emphasis has been on methods that may offer opportunity to suppress the incidence and/or growth of foodborne pathogens that originate with pork carcasses. The objective is to reduce the initial contamination level in such a way as to impact the microbial numbers through the remainder of the handling, fabrication and storage sequences normally used for pork products. 215C Meat Lab; 515-294-1091; Fax 515-294-6328; sebranek@iastate.edu.

    Catherine H. Strohbehn (B.S., Texas Tech University; M.S. and Ph.D., Iowa State University), Extension specialist and adjunct associate professor, hotel, restaurant and institution management. Her research and outreach interests focus on foodservice food safety, foodservice management, including procurement of foods from local sources and staff training. Responsible for maintaining the ISU Food Safety Consortium, ISU Extension food safety, and the Iowa HACCP web sites. 11 MacKay Hall; 515-294-3527; Fax 515-294-6364; cstrohbe@iastate.edu.

    Darrell Trampel (D.V.M., Iowa State University; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Pathologists). Dr. Trampel's research centers on Salmonella, Campylobacter, poultry and eggs. The major portion of Dr. Trampel's work in veterinary extension between 1985 and the present has consisted of providing diagnostic assistance to the Iowa poultry industry. VMRI, Building 1; 515-294-0710; Fax 515-294-8793; dtrampel@iastate.edu.

    Irene V. Wesley (B.S. and D.P.H., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., University of California, Irvine), microbiologist and lead scientist for Campylobacter and Listeria research. Dr. Wesley's research involves the development and application of rapid PCR-based methods for the detection of potential human foodborne pathogens in livestock and turkeys. Pathogens of interest include Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Arcobacter butzleri. Efforts are focused on-farm and post-slaughter. National Animal Disease Center, P.O. Box 70, Ames, Iowa 50010; 515-663-7291; Fax 515-663-7458; iwesley@nadc.ars.usda.gov.

    Jeffrey Wolt (B.S., bio-agricultural science, Colorado State University; M.S., soil fertility, Auburn University; Ph.D., soil chemistry, Auburn University), professor of agronomy. Dr. Wolt's research interests are biotechnology safety analysis applied to risk management and science policy decision-making; environmental and ecotoxicological risk assessment; soil and environmental chemistry applied to exposure assessment, efficacy, environmental monitoring, environmental toxicology, and environmental fate of xenobiotics. His research program consists of biotechnology risk assessment with emphasis on uncertainty analysis in using probability and possibility theory, ecological consequences of pollen and gene flow; risk management and communication. Consortium research is on the effects of mycotoxins in corn food and feed products and mitigating effects of transgenic corn and its implications for swine health. 164 Seed Science Center; 515-294-6899;
    jdwolt@iastate.edu; http://www.ag.iastate.edu/centers/seeds/.

    Qijing Zhang (B.VSc., Shandong Agricultural University, P.R. China; M.S., National Institute of Veterinary Biologics, China; Ph.D., Iowa State University), associate professor and Frank K. Ramsey Chair Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Zhang's major areas of expertise include bacteriology, molecular biology, antibiotic resistance, and pathogenic mechanisms of microbial infections. Primary interest is on foodborne human pathogens of animal origin. His laboratory is using fundamental and contemporary approaches to study the ecology of Campylobacter jejuni in animal reservoirs, elucidate the mechanisms for the development, persistence, and transfer of antibiotic resistance, examine the molecular basis of pathogen-host interactions, and develop approaches to control infectious diseases. 1116 College of Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-2038; Fax 515-294-8500; zhang123@iastate.edu.

    Co-Investigators

    Isabel Turney Harris (D.V.M., Ph.D., Iowa State University), affiliate assistant professor, Department of Microbiology, College of Agriculture. Research areas of interest include epidemiology of infectious diseases of animals, primarily Salmonella in swine and the associated risk of foodborne transmission to humans. Current projects are evaluating serologic methods for Salmonella prevalence determination in swine, elucidation of risk factors associated with high prevalence levels, and investigating intervention procedures designed to lower such risks.

    Post-Docs

    Kichang Nam (Ph.D., Iowa State University; M.S., Seoul National University, Korea; B.S., Seoul National University, Korea) postdoctoral research associate, Department of Animal Science, 2359 Kildee Hall. Research interests include: effect of irradiation on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of raw and cooked liquid whole egg; effects of double packaging and antioxidant treatments on pinking, off-odor, lipid oxidation, and pathogen survival in irradiated pork products; prevention of pinking and off-odor in irradiated pork; effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on the lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated beef patties.

    Eun Joo Lee (Ph.D., M.S., Korea University; B.S., Myongji University, Korea) postdoctoral research associate, Department of Animal Science. Dr. Lee's research areas are: mechanisms and control of off-odor production and color changes in irradiated raw and cooked meat; development of ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) detection method in irradiated food; development of education programs for the public understanding of irradiated food; development of HACCP programs for health food companies; physicochemical properties and eating quality of rice. 2373 Kildee Hall, 515-294-9186, Fax 515-294-9143; ejlee@iastate.edu.

    Graduate Students

    Bledar Bisha, graduate research assistant in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, is working in the lab of Dr. Byron Brehm-Stecher working on rapid cytometric detection of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in pork products. 2312 Food Science; 515-294-3011; bbisha@iastate.edu.

    Brenda Crabtree (B.S., microbiology, Iowa State University), research assistant, Department of Animal Science, working with Dr. Hank Harris developing quantitative real-time PCR for the detection of Salmonella in swine tissues. Kildee Hall; bgc@iastate.edu.

    James Delgado (B.S., chemistry, Texas A&M International University), research assistant working with Dr. Jeffrey Wolt researching mycotoxin risk to swine health through environmental transmission, and it amelioration due to Bt corn production and use in swine feed rations.

    Matthew Erdman (B.S. microbiology, D.V.M., Iowa State University, Ph.D. candidate in veterinary microbiology), research assistant, Department of Animal Science. Dr. Erdman's research thrust lies in the area of bacterial zoonotic diseases, more specifically, the preventive medicine and epidemiology associated with them. Current research focuses on the epidemiology of Salmonella in the pork chain and evaluating the use of vaccines for food safety. 11 Kildee Hall; 515-294-7898; Fax 515-294-5294; merdman@iastate.edu.

    Mayumi Fukuda, graduate research assistant working in the labs of Dr. Qijing Zhang in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine researching antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter in swine. 2178 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-5776; mayumif@iastate.edu.

    Amitra Jackson (B.S., animal science, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff; M.S., meat science with emphasis in food safety and security, Iowa State University) is a Ph.D. graduate research assistant with Dr. Joseph Sebranek. Researching the food safety implications of the “no-nitrite added” cured meats and the possible increased concern for cold tolerant pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, and the possible requirement of additional antimicrobial measures in ready-to-eat meats, particularly in pork products. 214 Meat Lab; 515-294-1548; ajackson@iastate.edu.

    James Peterson (B.S., Mankato State University), graduate research assistant in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Research interests are signal recognition particle dependent protein localization in E. coli. VMRI Building 6, Room 2002; 515-294-8385; Fax 515-294-1401; jpeter13@iastate.edu.

    Ann Schwartz (M.S., B.S., Iowa State University), graduate research assistant, National Animal Disease Center, USDA, Agricultural Research Service and the Department of Animal Science at Iowa State University. Current research involves: analysis of physiological stress and immune responses in Beltsville white turkeys after an experimental infection with Campylobacter jejuni; development of rapid detection methods for Listeria species in mechanically separated turkey meat. 383 Science I Building; 515-294-7863; ams123@iastate.edu.

    Agriculture Administration

    Wendy Wintersteen (B.S., agriculture, Kansas State University; Ph.D., entomology, Iowa State University), dean, College of Agriculture and director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. Dr. Wintersteen's research interests include pest management and reducing the health and environmental risks of pesticide applications. 138 Curtiss Hall; 515-294-2518; Fax 515-294-6800; agdean@iastate.edu.

    Animal Science

    Maynard G. Hogberg (Ph.D., M.S., B.S., Iowa State University), professor and chair, Department of Animal Science. Swine research. 1221 Kildee Hall; 515-294-2160; Fax 515-294-6994; hogberg@iastate.edu.

    Food Science and Human Nutrition

    Ruth MacDonald (Ph.D., nutrition/food science, University of Minnesota), chair and professor, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Dr. MacDonald relocated from the University of Missouri to Iowa State University in August 2004. The overall focus of her research team is to identify factors in foods that reduce the incidence or progression of cancer. The team works with animal and cell culture models that are relevant to human cancers of the breast, prostrate and colon. Presently, the work is funded by grants from the NIH-NIEHS, USDA-IFAFS and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). 2312 Food Sciences; 515-294-5991; Fax 515-294-8181; ruthmacd@iastate.edu.

    College of Veterinary Medicine Administration

    John Thomson (D.V.M., Iowa State University, M.S., Northwest Missouri State University) dean, College of Veterinary Medicine and Professor of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine. Research includes, clinical epidemiology, evidence-based medicine, outcomes assessment. 2506 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-1250; Fax 515-294-8341; thomson@iastate.edu.

    Donald L. Reynolds (B.S., D.V.M., and Ph.D., The Ohio State University), professor and associate dean for research, Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Primary research interests include pathogenesis of enteric disease of poultry and food safety concerns related to detection of pathogenic strains of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry. 2520 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-9348; Fax 515-294-8341; dlr@iastate.edu.

    Veterinary Pathology

    Claire B. Andreasen (D.V.M., Texas A&M University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia; Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Pathologists), professor and chair, Department of Veterinary Pathology. Dr. Andreasen's work focuses on leukocyte function in avians and mammals and infectious disease and hematopoietic interaction. She also studies and teaches comparative clinical pathology including hematology and chemistry, immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry. 1789 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-0959; Fax 515-294-5423; candreas@iastate.edu.

    Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine

    Lisa Nolan (D.V.M., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia), professor and chair, Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine. Research focuses on bacterial diseases of production animals. The long-term goal of one such project is to establish the molecular basis of virulence of avian Escherichia coli, the causative agent of colibacillosis, an economically devastating problem for this country's poultry industry. Other projects use molecular approaches to study the virulence of various E. coli causing disease in cattle and mink and antimicrobial resistance in salmonellae of pigs. 2178 Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-3534; lknolan@iastate.edu.

    Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine

    Patrick Halbur (DVM, M.S., and Ph.D., Iowa State University) professor and chair of the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine. Dr. Halbur's research is focused on the pathogenesis and control of infectious and zoonotic diseases of swine, particularly porcine circovirus and swine hepatitis E virus and Streptococcus suis, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Erysipelas rhusiopathiae. 2630 College of Veterinary Medicine; 515-294-3564; pghalbur@iasate.edu.

    Research/Technical Support

    Steven Niebuhr, microbiology lab technician working with Dr. James Dickson in his laboratory research. 2293 Kildee Hall; 515-294-4663; Fax 515-294-6019; sniebuhr@iastate.edu.

    Collaborators

    Michael Grant (B.S., Seattle University, M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University) microbiologist in the U.S. FDA Pacific Regional Laboratory, Northwest at Western Washington University. I have conducted research with emphasis on rapid detection of pathogens in food, concentrating particularly on pathogenic E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes. I have also conducted research in the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and been active in regional and national activities in AOAC International. I recently completed a comprehensive redesign of the standard method for enumeration of E. coli (biotype 1) in foods, which is under consideration to replace the existing method used nationwide in the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual. 425-402-3179; mgrant@ora.fda.gov.

    Craig Moyer (Ph.D., University of Hawaii; M.S., B.S., Oregon State University), associate professor, Biology Department, Western Washington University. Marine biologist researching neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria and the microbial iron cycle; exploring the submarine Ring of Fire for NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration; microbial diversity at the Mariana Convergent Margin: a window into the ultra-deep biosphere; mariana convergent margin: geochemical, tectonic and biological processes in the intermediate depths of an active subduction factory.

    Billy M. Hargis, professor of poultry science, University of Arkansas. Dr. Hargis is a veterinarian with expertise in poultry health and ante mortem food safety intervention, poultry immunology and endocrinology. Poultry Science 0-308; 479-575-4390; bhargis@uark.edu.


    NATIONAL ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER
    NATIONAL VETERINARY SERVICES LABORATORIES
    P.O. Box 70, Dayton Road, Ames, Iowa 50010

    Tom Bunn (M.S., Iowa State University; D.V.M., Texas A&M University), laboratory chief, Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratories. His focus is bacterial pathogens of animals. NVSL, P.O. Box 844, Ames, Iowa 50010; 515-239-8563; Fax 515-239-8569; Thomas.O.Bunn@usda.gov.

    Tom Casey (B.S., College of Steubenville; Ph.D., Uniform Services University of the Health Sciences), microbiologist in Coli bacillosis research. Dr. Casey conducts research to define the role of gastrointestinal microorganisms and infectious diseases in domestic animals, and of foodborne diseases in humans. He also studies ways to control these diseases. His research includes studies of adherence and colonization of pathogenic Escherichia coli in animals. 515-663-7726; Fax 515-663-7458; tcasey@nadc.ars.usda.gov.

    Evelyn A. Dean-Nystrom (B.S., Colorado State University; M.P.H. and Ph.D., University of Michigan), microbiologist in the Pre-Harvest Food Safety and Enteric Diseases Research Unit. Dr. Dean-Nystrom's research focus is on mechanisms of bacterial adherence at mucosal surfaces. Her food safety research focus is E. coli O157:H7 colonization of bovine tissues. 515-663-7376; Fax 515-663-7458; enystrom@nadc.ars.usda.gov.

    John D. Neill (B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Indiana State University), microbiologist in viruses and foods. Dr. Neill's primary research involves detection and identification of viruses in meat products. This work involves use of PCR and classical virus isolation techniques to screen food products for viral pathogens. 515-239-8443; Fax 515-239-8458.

    Tom Stabel (B.S., Hampden-Sydney College; Ph.D., North Carolina State University), microbiologist in Salmonella research. Dr. Stabel's main area of research is with Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella choleraesuis in swine, with an emphasis on cellular immunity. The objective is to identify, then manipulate specific immune parameters responsible for prevention and/or control of swine salmonellosis. 515-663-7292; Fax 515-663-7458; tstabel@nadc.ars.usda.gov.



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    KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
    Manhattan, Kansas 66506

    Principal Investigators

    Michael Boland (B.A., University of St. Thomas; M.Ed., University of Minnesota; M.S., Ph.D, Purdue University), associate professor, Department of Agricultural Economics. His work emphasizes studies on the cost comparison of technologies used to control pathogens and simulation evaluations of packing plant operations. His research includes benefit/cost studies of intervention technologies and cost impacts of regulations such as HACCP and SSOP. 342 Waters; 785-532-4449; Fax 785-532-6925; mboland@ksu.edu.

    John (Sean) Fox (B.S., University College Dublin, Ireland; Ph.D., Iowa State University), Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics. His work on the economics of food safety includes cost-benefit analyses of intervention strategies to control pathogens, consumer acceptance of food irradiation and genetic modification, and how information from different sources influences consumer preferences. His recent work has examined the economic impacts of regulations and trade restrictions related to the discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the U.S., and the potential economic impacts of avian influenza. 331 Waters; 785-532-4446; Fax 785-532-6925; seanfox@agecon.ksu.edu.

    Daniel Y. C. Fung (B.A., International Christian University, Tokyo; M.S.P.H., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Iowa State University), professor, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Dr. Fung's major research areas are food microbiology, public health microbiology and food science methodology development. His research for the Consortium consists of development of rapid methods for isolation, detection, enumeration and identification of foodborne pathogens; development of miniaturized microbiological techniques; effects of dyes on bacteria, yeast and mold; evaluation of rapid, automated methods such as a spiral plating system; omnispec system, catalase test, double tube test, etc.; and effects of chemical and physical methods to control food pathogens. He graduated 33 Ph.D. and 68 M.S students as the major professor, many of these students were supported by the Consortium. Elected Director of the Center for Detection, National Alliance for Food Safety and Security. 216-E Call; 785-532-1208; Fax 785-532-5681; dfung@ksu.edu.

    Kelly J. K. Getty (B.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University; M.S., Pennsylvania State University), assistant professor, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and Food Science Institute. Her major research interests are food safety, meat processing, and validation of processes for controlling pathogens. With the Consortium she is researching processes for control and recovery of pathogens especially E. coli O157:H7 in fermented and direct acidified sausage products. Dr. Getty is also developing protocols on interactive distance learning food safety and food microbiology modules. 216 Call Hall; 785-532-2203; Fax 785-532-5861; kgetty@ksu.edu.

    Melvin C. Hunt (B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri), professor, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. His major research areas are myoglobin chemistry, meat color packaging and lighting and low-fat meat processing technology. With the Consortium he is studying safety factors associated with premature browning and persistent pink-colored ground beef and cooked color issues in restructured and low-fat beef and pork and color and safety aspects of modified atmosphere packaging. 224 Weber; 785-532-1232; Fax 785-532-7059; hhunt@ksu.edu.

    Curtis L. Kastner (B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University), director, Food Science Institute; professor. Dr. Kastner's major research is in postmortem handling, processing and evaluation of meat and meat products. With the Consortium he is researching microbiological characteristics of further processed beef products; microbial sampling and evaluation techniques for carcasses and products; and evaluation of techniques designed to reduce microbial hazards associated with carcass and product processing. 216 Call Hall; 785-532-1234; Fax 785-532-5861; ckastner@ksu.edu.

    Justin Kastner (B.S., Kansas State University; M.Sc., London South Bank University; Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health, University of Edinburgh; Ph.D., University of Guelph), assistant professor of food safety and security. Dr. Justin Kastner conducts scholarly activities related to trade policy, economic history and the history of science, international political economy, and multidisciplinary research and writing. In tandem with Dr. Jason Ackleson of New Mexico State University, he coordinates Frontier-an interdisciplinary program for the historical studies of border security, food security, and trade policy (http://frontier.k-state.edu). Dr. J. Kastner publishes and lectures on an array of issues: the World Trade Organization (WTO), the WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures, veterinary history, the history of public health, North American border issues, and the history of trade disputes regarding food safety and animal disease. Dr. J. Kastner examines both historical and contemporary trade-policy questions; he provides perspectives and lessons from the past. Dr. Kastner serves as co-instructor for the graduate courses Multidisciplinary Thought and Presentation and Trade and Agricultural Health. He is actively involved with both on-campus and distance education. Dept. of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology; 310 Coles Hall; 785-532-4820; jkastner@k-state.edu.

    James L. Marsden (B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University), professor, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Dr. Marsden's research focuses on development of HACCP processes and procedures, antimicrobial treatments for processed meat products, validation of dry sausage production and irradiation. 225 Call; 785-532-1952; Fax 785-532-5681; jmarsden@ksu.edu.

    Abbey L. Nutsch (B.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University), assistant professor, Department of Animal Sciences & Industry. Dr. Nutsch is a food microbiologist with expertise in the microbiological safety of meat products. Her work with the Consortium includes coordination and facilitation of interdisciplinary initiatives to integrate research, data, and program development across disciplines to enhance the effectiveness of collaborative food safety and security efforts. 310 Coles Hall; 785-532-4549; Fax 785-532-4039; anutsch@ksu.edu.

    Richard D. Oberst (D.V.M., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of California), associate professor of pathology and molecular biology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology. His emphasis in the food safety area includes investigations in the ecology and control of zoonotic diseases and DNA/PCR methodology for pathogen detection. Veterinary Clinical Sciences Building; 785-532-4411; Fax 785-532-4288; oberst@vetksu.edu.

    Randall K. Phebus (B.S., animal sciences, M.S. and Ph.D., food sciences, University of Tennessee), professor of food science, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. His Consortium research interests include the effects of various processing/packaging technologies on the control/elimination of meat pathogens and spoilage microflora especially when used in combinations with various functional additives and antimicrobials. He is investigating the use of antimicrobial intervention treatments in meat processing and the development of new and/or improved methods for detection of pathogens. 223 Call; 785-532-1215; Fax 785-532-5681; phebus@ksu.edu.

    Deanna Retzlaff (B.S., University of Tennessee, Ph.D., Kansas State University), assistant professor, Food Science Institute. Her major research interests are in food safety microbiology. Recent research has centered on steam pastuerization of carcasses and trim for beef processing facilities. Her current focus is on the development and delivery of food science and safety distance education through mediated formats and using interactive modules to promote learning and provide food safety training for the food industry. 785-532-2202; Fax 785-532-5861; retzlaff@ksu.edu.

    J. Scott Smith (B.S., biology/chemistry, Brescia College; M.S., biochemistry, Kansas State University; Ph.D., food science, Pennsylvania State University), professor of food chemistry, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. His research interests are analytical chemistry/metabolism of toxins, pesticide metabolism, fumonisin degradation and analysis and production of heterocyclic amines in cooked meat products. For the Consortium he is researching analytical methods and metabolism of Fusarium mycotoxins, formation of heterocyclic amines in muscle foods and developments of methods to measure muscle foods irradiation exposure. 208 Call; 785-532-1219; Fax 785-532-5681; jsschem@ksu.edu.

    Research and Technical Support

    Beth Ann Crozier-Dodson (B.S., M.S., Ph.D., food science, Kansas State University), supervisor and research coordinator for the Food Safety and Security Laboratories of Kansas State University, under the direction of Dr. Daniel Y. C. Fung and Dr. James Marsden. Her major interests are aeromicrobiology and the control of food pathogens and development of rapid methods for the detection of spoilage organisms, food pathogens and starter cultures. She is also the food microbiology laboratory leader and the Assistant Director of the International Rapid Methods and Automation in Microbiology Workshop since 1996. In this capacity she is responsible for contacting industry participants and oversees all aspects of the operation of the laboratory portion of the workshop, an important technology transfer role of the FSC. 785-532-1298; Fax 785.532.5681; bethann@ksu.edu.

    Priyadarshini Gadgil (B.S., M.S., Mumbai University, India, M.S., Kansas State University). Prini is a Ph.D. candidate and research assistant in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Her research focuses on isolation and quantification of unique hydrocarbons as from irradiated beef, and studying their toxicity and metabolism. 230 Call Hall; 785-532-1297; Fax 785-532-5681; pgadgil@ksu.edu.

    S. Luke Hillyard (B.S., Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, Ph.D., University of California, Davis) research assistant for the meat science group and supervisor for the meat chemistry laboratory. His areas of interest are the application of chemistry and biochemistry to the study of meat and meat products. Responsibilities include assisting faculty and graduate students on projects ranging from microbiological sampling of ready to eat products to assays related to the biochemistry of post mortem muscle. 201 Weber Hall; 785-532-1275; Fax 785-532-7059; slhilly@ksu.edu.

    Graduate Students

    Cesar Guillermo Caballero (B.S., food science and industry, Kansas State University), M.S. candidate of Dr. Daniel Y. C. Fung, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Student laboratory employee. 202 Call Hall; 785-313-5244; Fax 785.532.5681; gc3939@ksu.edu.

    Sarah DeDonder (B.S. biology, Emporia State University; M.S. diagnostic medicine/pathobiology, Kansas State University). DeDonder is currently a graduate student in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology and is currently working on her Ph.D. in food safety and security. Her current interests are frozen, uncooked, breaded chicken products. She is studying consumers' food handling behavior during preparation and the microbiological risk associated with these products. 785-532-3887; Fax 785-532-4039; sdedonde@vet.ksu.edu.

    Staci DeGeer (B.S., food science and industry, Kansas State University), M.S. candidate of Dr. Daniel Y.C. Fung, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Staci's research focuses on the validation of a food pathogen detection system for the detection and enumeration of food pathogens. 202 Call Hall; 785-532-1298; sdegeer@ksu.edu.

    Fariba Emamgholizadeh (M.D., Azad Tehran University, Iran), M.S. candidate, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University. Her research project as a graduate research assistant include effects of marinating beef steaks with different commercial mixed spices and reduction effects on heterocyclic amines, as well as focusing on probably human health effects as reduction of mutagens in cooked meats. 229 Call Hall; 785-532-1296; riba@ksu.edu.

    Alexandra Gregory (B.S., M.S., agricultural economics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus), graduate research assistant, Department of Agricultural Economics. Gregory's research involves analysis of the economic impacts of restrictions on the use of sub-therapeutic antibiotics as growth promotants in animal agriculture. 785-532-6709; Fax 785-532-6925; agregory@agecon.ksu.edu.

    Nigel M. Harper (B.S. Food Science, Purdue University) M.S. candidate of Dr. Kelly J.K. Getty, Department of Animal Science and Industry. His research interests include validation of jerky processing and reduction methods of pathogens in dairy products. 202 Call Hall;785-532-1298; nmharper@ksu.edu.

    Faraj Hijaz (B. S., Birzeit University, Palestine; M. S., Kansas State University), Ph.D. candidate and research assistant in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. His research focuses on development of rapid methods for testing of meat contaminated by ammonia refrigerant leaks, measuring the transmission rate of ammonia through popular films used in packaging meat products, and studying the degree of contamination during low levels refrigerant leaks. 229 Call Hall; 785-532-1296; Fax 785-532-5681; fhijaz@ksu.edu.

    Faris Hussain (B.S., microbiology, Mustansiria University, Iraq), M.S. candidate, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. His research project as a graduate research assistant involves the degradation of aflatoxin and reduction of their mutagenic and toxic properties, focusing on the application of the degradation methods in the food production process. 229 Call Hall; 785-532-1296; hfaris@ksu.edu.

    Pia A. Karim (M.S., industrial technology, Saint-Joseph University, Beirut), Ph.D. student in food microbiology and food safety under Dr. James Marsden, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. 209 Call Hall; 785-317-6602; piaa@ksu.edu.

    Anand Mohan, Ph.D. candidate of Dr. Melvin Hunt. Postmortem muscle food quality with special emphasis on factors that affect the meat color, quality, and safety traits including meat flavor interactions with antimicrobials and antioxidants. 216 Weber Hall; 785-532-1269, Fax 785-532-7059.

    Amin Mugera (B.A., agribusiness management, Egerton University, Kenya; M.S., agricultural economics and agribusiness, Michigan State University). Graduate research assistant, Department of Agricultural Economics. Amin is currently working on an analysis of the potential economic impacts of avian influenza on the U.S. poultry industry. 785-532-6709; Fax 785-532-6925; amugera@agecon.ksu.edu.

    Kanithaporn Puangsombat (B.S., M.S., Kasetsart University, Thailand), Ph.D. candidate and graduate research assistant, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Kanithaporn's research focuses on using antioxidant from spices to inhibit carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amines in cooked meat products. 230 Call Hall; 785-532-1297; Fax 785-532-5681; kanitp@ksu.edu.

    Jasdeep Kaur Saini (B.S., food and nutrition, Punjab Agricultural University, India), M.S. candidate of Dr. James L. Marsden and Dr. Daniel Y.C. Fung, Department of Animal Science and Industry. Jasdeep's research focuses on reducing Listeria monocytogenes in the food processing environments and studying the potential for translocation of Listeria from floor drains onto food contact surfaces in the surrounding environment. 202 Call Hall; 785-532-1298; jasdeep@ksu.edu.

    Buffy Ann Stohs (B.S., food science and industry, Kansas State University), M.S. candidate of Dr. Daniel Y. C. Fung, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Buffy's research focuses on the use of organic acids to reduce the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in frankfurters. 202 Call Hall; 785-532-1298; buffy@ksu.edu.

    Casey G. Weber (B.S. Food Science and Industry, Kansas State University) M.S. Canidate under Dr. Daniel Y.C. Fung Food Microbiology, Animal Sciences and Industry. Research focus's on the identification of natural microflora and use of Persimmon Puree as an antimicrobial agent in a liquid medium. 202 Call Hall; 785-532-1298; cweb81@ksu.edu,

    Erin J. Wenke (B.S., Animal Science and Industry, Kansas State University), M.S. candidate of Dr. Daniel Y.C. Fung, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. Erin's research focuses on comparing detection and enumeration capabilities of a new chromogenic medium with standard methods using E. coli, Salmonella spp., and Enterobacter sakazakii. 202 Call Hall; 785-532-1298; ejwenke@cox.net.

    Xiaorong Wu (B.S., M.S., Zhengzhou Grain College, China), Department of Animal Sciences and Industry. His research will involve the occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins. 785-532-1296; Fax 785-532-5681; xwu3786@ksu.edu.



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