Eastern Native Tree Society 

 

 

The Eastern Native Tree Society Website has been moved to:

http://www.nativetreesociety.org 

 

 

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The Eastern Native Tree Society (ENTS) is a cyberspace interest group devoted to the celebration of trees of the eastern North America through art, poetry, music, mythology, science, medicine, and wood crafts.

  • ENTS is the foremost organization for accurately measuring, mapping  and documenting the great trees and forests of Eastern North America;
  • ENTS conducted the first detailed mapping of the branch and trunk structure and volume measurements for the largest Eastern trees, including -  The Middleton Oak and Sag Branch Tulip;
  • The Tsuga Search Project is documenting the great Eastern Hemlocks before they fall prey to the invasive Hemlock Wooly Adelgid;
  • ENTS is a co-sponsors of the Forest Summit Series at Holyoke College in Massachusetts and the latest Eastern Old Growth Conference in Arkansas.

The Eastern Native Tree Society has been established to accurately measure and record the tallest trees, historical trees, and ancient forests.  Eastern North America has been graced with forests of fantastic beauty and diversity. These forests have been heavily impacted by development, disease and human utilization. This unfortunate history has diverted our attention from the remarkably huge and ancient forests which have survived this catastrophe. Even today we are finding the largest and oldest trees ever recorded for some native species. The tallest white pine ever accurately recorded was recently documented in the Cataloochie district of Great Smokey Mountains National Park. The oldest trees ever recorded in eastern North America have been recently discovered along the Black River, in eastern North Carolina.  ENTS is also intended as an archive for information on specific trees and stands of trees. ENTS will store data on accurately measured trees for historical documentation purposes, scientific research, and to resolve big tree disputes.